1st year propagating and have questions regarding my cuttings

jaycraig

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when is the best time to transplant the cuttings that have rooted given they all root at a difference pace? (arrows indicated the sprouted ones)

1st picture those are weeping cherry cuttings and about 4-5 are spouting, 2 has leaves that hardened or about to harden. couple more about to sprout

2nd picture are JM and seiryu JM, but for the seiryu havent shown any signs or growth. ive hear they are hard to grow but i figured id give them a shot

3rd picture we have some yoshiro cherry blossom i believe or some other white petaled cherry. no signs or growth but theyre still are green, are there any hope in these?

4th picture we have some 2-3 year old JM clump, i slightly raised them out the pot a month ago to tie them together and now the top has withered while they are back budding, at first i they died were about to die till i saw the back budding, sure i trunk chop the upper half or the withered ones or leave them?
 

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Shibui

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First you need to understand that, while new shoots is a good sign, does not always mean there's roots below. Lots of cuttings will grow new shoots with energy reserves in the stem but sometimes fail to grow roots. Results are wilt and death a few weeks later.

I usually wait until I see roots growing out the drain holes in the cutting pots so I know I have good strong roots then pot them on. There's always a few that are slow and I just put them back in the cutting mix and back to the propagating area. You can also tip the pot upside down supporting the cutting mix and cuttings on a hand and gently remove the pot to see what's happening. If not enough roots just place the pot back and tip back the correct way up.
There's no best time of year to pot on rooted cuttings. Do it whenever they have enough roots. I rarely have any problem transplanting rooted cuttings no matter what time of year and they grow better after transplant when the roots are in good soil and have access to fertilizer. In really hot weather I place the new potted cuttings in part shade and sheltred from wind for a few days until they settle into the new pots.

3rd picture we have some yoshiro cherry blossom i believe or some other white petaled cherry. no signs or growth but theyre still are green, are there any hope in these?
While there's green there's always hope. Some species take a lot longer to root. Some junipers take 6-12 months to produce roots.
 

jaycraig

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First you need to understand that, while new shoots is a good sign, does not always mean there's roots below. Lots of cuttings will grow new shoots with energy reserves in the stem but sometimes fail to grow roots. Results are wilt and death a few weeks later.

I usually wait until I see roots growing out the drain holes in the cutting pots so I know I have good strong roots then pot them on. There's always a few that are slow and I just put them back in the cutting mix and back to the propagating area. You can also tip the pot upside down supporting the cutting mix and cuttings on a hand and gently remove the pot to see what's happening. If not enough roots just place the pot back and tip back the correct way up.
There's no best time of year to pot on rooted cuttings. Do it whenever they have enough roots. I rarely have any problem transplanting rooted cuttings no matter what time of year and they grow better after transplant when the roots are in good soil and have access to fertilizer. In really hot weather I place the new potted cuttings in part shade and sheltred from wind for a few days until they settle into the new pots.


While there's green there's always hope. Some species take a lot longer to root. Some junipers take 6-12 months to produce roots.
519F5EFC-84D4-405C-9F3C-3DE38E162D04.jpeg
i have them in the plastic container atm but there are 2 cuttings that about to hit the ceiling, do i just take the whole pot out and just leave in the shaded area? if i do they would be as humid and they seem to be doing really well in this current temperature and humidity
 

Shibui

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That brings up a whole new lot of questions like how tall are the new shoots and how big is the box?
Any sign of roots showing at the bottom of the pot?
If they do have roots, taking the pots out of the box will be OK but may kill any others that have not yet produced roots. I guess that's the dilemma of having limited space in the box. Try a taller box next time?
Shoots touching the plastic box probably won't hurt so you could leave them a bit longer. Some of the leaves are likely to be affected with fungus but doesn't appear to have much overall affect on the cutting or others.

As mentioned earlier you could unpot them and pot up any that have roots in potting soil. Those will be OK out of the box afterward as they have roots to get their own water.
Any that don't have roots can be put back in the propagating pot and back in the box to have a second chance.

There are so many variables at play that it is almost impossible to give absolute advice, especially from halfway round the world.
 

jaycraig

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That brings up a whole new lot of questions like how tall are the new shoots and how big is the box?
Any sign of roots showing at the bottom of the pot?
If they do have roots, taking the pots out of the box will be OK but may kill any others that have not yet produced roots. I guess that's the dilemma of having limited space in the box. Try a taller box next time?
Shoots touching the plastic box probably won't hurt so you could leave them a bit longer. Some of the leaves are likely to be affected with fungus but doesn't appear to have much overall affect on the cutting or others.

As mentioned earlier you could unpot them and pot up any that have roots in potting soil. Those will be OK out of the box afterward as they have roots to get their own water.
Any that don't have roots can be put back in the propagating pot and back in the box to have a second chance.

There are so many variables at play that it is almost impossible to give absolute advice, especially from halfway round the world.
no root pushing out the bottom as yet. i found a temporary solution tho as i search for a new container, won’t last for long but will do for now901B0700-2CBB-44BB-B8BD-69838B0A7327.jpeg
 
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