2 unknown pines collected today...

Messages
139
Likes
147
Location
Hillsboro, Oregon
USDA Zone
7/8
#1
....was walking one of my dogs this morning and spotted these little pines about to get mowed by the ditch gang. I asked them if they could leave em so i could come back and get them later, but that was a no go. So with no tools on me, one hand holding on to my dogs leash, did the ol' grab and pull technique with my other hand....
I managed to get a decent amount of roots on the "bigger" one but had to twist and break the long taproot. The smaller/skinnier one came out with most all the roots, i coiled the long taproot up in the bottom of the 4"pot i put it in when i got them home. Neither one had any dirt left on them after i ripped them out of the ground that was mostly gravel.
I cut the candles in half and prayed to the tree gods for them to survive.

Should i cut off more now? Wait?

Anyone know what type hese are? I could also go back and get a photo of the adult parent tree if that would help.
* 20160522_120951.jpg 20160522_121000.jpg 20160522_121031.jpg 20160522_121043.jpg

*shit photos are due to shitty/broken phone camera.
 
Messages
139
Likes
147
Location
Hillsboro, Oregon
USDA Zone
7/8
#3
Look for the ones they've mowed over 5 or 6 times.

If these live, you'll be extremely lucky.

But frankly, start with something bigger, and cut it back.
Yeah, i wont be holding my breath on these surviving. Its just i have this dissorder of some kind.....i would rather kill it than the ditch gang hahahaha:D
 
Messages
591
Likes
761
Location
Western Washington
#4
The 2 species I've seen volunteer most often in the Williamette Valley are Scots (widespread) and Valley Ponderosa (scattered). I haven't seen Shore Pine regenerate there (if others have, please correct me). Hindsight is always genius, but maybe better to just let them get mowed (free trunk chop) then collect at a better time. The new growth is drooping. A signal of water stress. How long they were in air barefooted is a pretty big deal here. Damp soil in a greenhouse setting may not be enough. These may just end up in the new lesson archives.
 
Messages
139
Likes
147
Location
Hillsboro, Oregon
USDA Zone
7/8
#5
The 2 species I've seen volunteer most often in the Williamette Valley are Scots (widespread) and Valley Ponderosa (scattered). I haven't seen Shore Pine regenerate there (if others have, please correct me). Hindsight is always genius, but maybe better to just let them get mowed (free trunk chop) then collect at a better time. The new growth is drooping. A signal of water stress. How long they were in air barefooted is a pretty big deal here. Damp soil in a greenhouse setting may not be enough. These may just end up in the new lesson archives.
They were re digging the ditch to put in a culvert pipe and cover it with a sidewalk. They were for sure gonners if i left them.
The tree they were under,which i am 99% sure is the parent tree will also be taken out soon....
The new growth looked like that before i pulled em up and hasnt drooped any more that i have noticed. They are stiff /not very bendy like the other pine i killed earlier was.....it has been raining a good bit this last week tho....
 
Messages
1,932
Likes
1,249
Location
Eugene, OR
USDA Zone
8
#6
Suspect Scots is more likely. Also possibility that is Shore pine. Perhaps checking to see what adult pines grow near would tell you. If surviving tall one could easily be made into literati since no lower branches;).