5 Yr Native Tree Native Pot Challenge: ShadyStump's American Elm

ShadyStump

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Dug it out of the yard over the summer. All I've done before now is trim back the foliage to spur back budding, and put a stick between the three trunks to push them out of alignment. Before, if you looked at it on the side angle, they were all in a straight row, and looked like there was one trunk.
I intend to do next to nothing before spring, though I may apply some guy wires before long.
KIMG0499.JPG
 

Forsoothe!

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It may be an Elm from America, but is not Ulmus americana, leaf 3 to 8" long.
 

leatherback

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Aren’t you worried about Dutch elm disease?
I think bonsai would be less of a risk, untill they get mature enough to have substantial bark and draw in bark beetles. Anybody know the risks?

Healthy elm trees can become infected by the feeding of spore-contaminated elm bark beetles or through the development of grafts between their roots and the roots of infected trees (Figure 15). Trees infected via beetle vectors often first develop symptoms in an upper section of the crown, whereas trees infected via root grafts often first develop symptoms lower in the crown.
 

ShadyStump

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It may be an Elm from America, but is not Ulmus americana, leaf 3 to 8" long.

The leaves have downsized since I collected it, but yes, they were much bigger when the tree was much bigger.
I took almost a solid 5 feet off the top, and this is what's budded back since then, then again when I cut that back to encourage budding lower down for sacrificials. So late in the year and a pot of mostly gravel doing god-knows-what to the roots below, yeah, the leaves didn't come back full sized last time.
It's actually a little concerning as far as the challenge goes, because I can't imagine smaller leaves wouldn't effect the rate of growth. I had hoped that the enormous pot would allow fairly free growth, but I think a growing medium of gravel might be slowing it down all over again. Guess I'll know for sure come spring.
But if, perchance, you're right and I've misidentified it, I'll know for sure about other trees to replace it come spring.

Aren’t you worried about Dutch elm disease?

Well, I wasn't until now!
LOL
Actually, we're in a climate just arid enough that many fungal type infections are not a major concern, but I have already spotted tiny little beetles on it, so I'll be keeping an eye on that come spring. For now, we're anticipating out first hard freeze before too long. That'll hopefully clean out much of the vermin, then I might be able to keep them from coming back with a little bit of care.
 

Forsoothe!

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NO don't wait to treat the bugs. There are several kinds of beetles that attack Elm and at least their eggs will over-winter.
 

ShadyStump

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NO don't wait to treat the bugs. There are several kinds of beetles that attack Elm and at least their eggs will over-winter.

Ok, then. I won't wait.
I'll see what we have around the house. Just moved, and most other unpacking takes priority over the gardening supplies.
 

ShadyStump

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It may be an Elm from America, but is not Ulmus americana, leaf 3 to 8" long.

Upon further research, I do believe you are right. I believe it is ulmus crassifolia, cedar elm. I'll have to dig deeper into it's native range to see if it meets the 200 mile standard for the challenge. I'm keeping it one way or another, but we'll have to see about it's challenge worthiness.

However, I do believe that THIS is in fact ulmus americana.
KIMG0505.JPG
Just discovered it on the fence line of our new home we just moved into.

Now, the decision is this: if my original submission does not meet the requirements, do I request this thread be deleted, or do I resolve to attempt an air layer of the new tree in spring and keep this thread going solely for the sake of funssies?
 

ShadyStump

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Upon research and reflection, I'm requesting this thread be deleted.

The original tree was grossly misidentified, and I cannot sufficiently establish it's nativity under the rules, and cannot reasonably suspect I'll get the actual American elm I found to successfully move to a pot given its location and position in the fence. :(

And now I have an excuse to go tree hunting again. :)
 
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