a little visiter

lupe21

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little baby gray tree frog on my hornbeam
 

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Alex DeRuiter

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Aww. lol -- I'm not sure if there is any danger in keeping these frogs around, but I would imagine that a huge advantage would be that it eats the insects.

There were a TON of little frogs (or toads, perhaps? They didn't start as tadpoles...which one is that? lol) that seemed to have materialized all over our yard -- you couldn't take one step without seeing tons of frogs jump to safety.
 

tatorger

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both frogs and toads start as tadpoles.... dry and bumpy or smooth and slimy?
 

Alex DeRuiter

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Really? Dang...well, I withdraw my previous statement. lol -- serves me right for trusting my girlfriend ;-p

Dry and bumpy -- I'm assuming that's a toad, right? :)
 

lupe21

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nope gray tree frog this is the second year i see these baby frogs around this area there is a huge wisteria i believe in front of my house where i keep my tree i believe these frogs lay their eggs on these leaves and they are born there i could be wrong tho but this tree seems like a huge nursing ground for tree frogs ive only seen these frogs as adults once on my house the tree frogs i usually see are the green tree frogs which seem to be way more common speaking of toads i see lots of em but they dont get on the trees good for bugs and mosquitos so i leave them alone also baby skinks
 

rockm

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Tree frogs are frogs. They begin as tadpoles swimming around in a body of water. Their eggs aren't laid on plants, but in water. If you have standing water--even in relatively small areas (in gutters, tree stumps, fountains, drainage ditch, etc) tree frogs and other frogs will lay eggs in it and their tadpoles will use it as a nursery.

Your wisteria probably offers shelter for these critters from predators. It's probalby not where the frogs are born and develop though.
 

treebeard55

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A dry frog is a dead frog. They (and toads) breathe partly thru their skin, which must stay moist.

Amphibians like frogs and toads are especially susceptible to environmental degradation. So if you've got a bunch of them sticking around, it means your local ecosystem is at least fairly healthy.

And they eat bugs, yes. :)
 

lupe21

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tree frogs do lay their eggs on leafs they lay them on leafs above a ;ool of water
 

daveskib

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Treefrog tadpoles develop quickly often in temporary pools and puddles. I had spring peeper tadpoles and they transformed to frogs in two weeks.
 

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