A Twin Trunk Sierra Juniper

markyscott

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#21
You will need to change the planting angle first - at least have a plan for it. The tree as it stands has no future with two telephone pole trunks. So you need to go left, or right. I think your decision in this respect will also impact your grafting plans.

...I should probably have added - unless your plans are to reduce the trunks another 50% so you eliminate the vertical sections.
Thanks - I agree that the rhino horn and the telephone pole are difficult design elements. The plan is to eliminate most or all of the trunk above the grafts. The apex will be built from the higher grafts on the two trunks and the jin reduced to somewhere around that point.

Short tree built around the deadwood at the base.

Working on a virt, but someone is going to have to send me to remedial virt school.

Scott
 

markyscott

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#22
A little over a year later. 4 of the five grafts appear to have taken, but the apical graft died.

image.jpeg

Continued to ween the seedlings from their roots in preparation spectating later in the season. Grafted a new kishu seedling for the apex.

Cut back some of the top growth.

Scott
 

markyscott

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#24
Going to be an awesome tree when the grafts take over. Please don't be tempted to carve on any of the natural deadwood.
Thank you Paul. And thanks for the reminder to not carve the deadwood. Rest assured that I have no intention of doing so. It'll be enough of a challenge for me to blend the new jins into the old deadwood as naturally as possible.

Scott
 
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#25
Mighty fine material. Mighty fine work. I appreciate the photo tracking of your work and the commentary along the way.

A rough sketch might help demonstrate what you're thinking as you head out further. Don't try to be to exact at first in the sketch phase...a simple thick black marker will show the story. If eDrawing is not a strength....just marker it out on paper and take a photo. The drawing will tell you lots....and me too. John Naka's sketchbook is a great example of simple directional drawing with minimal detail to tell the story. It's an excellent bonsai drawing reference guide.

And agreement with others....the natural deadwood is fabulous.
 

markyscott

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#26
Mighty fine material. Mighty fine work. I appreciate the photo tracking of your work and the commentary along the way.

A rough sketch might help demonstrate what you're thinking as you head out further. Don't try to be to exact at first in the sketch phase...a simple thick black marker will show the story. If eDrawing is not a strength....just marker it out on paper and take a photo. The drawing will tell you lots....and me too. John Naka's sketchbook is a great example of simple directional drawing with minimal detail to tell the story. It's an excellent bonsai drawing reference guide.

And agreement with others....the natural deadwood is fabulous.
Hi Tieball. You know, I do drawings all the time, but I don't think I have for this one yet. Perhaps it's time. I'll try and make one from each of the alternate fronts.

Scott
 
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#27
I look forward to seeing the drawings....when you get to them. I find them very helpful. I also want to be sure to follow your progress on this tree.
 
Last edited:
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#28
I wonder if you should remove a good amount of foliage forme the top to redirect that energy to the grafts? More of a question for my own personal knowledge.
 
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#29
I wonder if you should remove a good amount of foliage forme the top to redirect that energy to the grafts? More of a question for my own personal knowledge.
Maybe. But I am really far away from being any expert on the subject.

I have believed that in the early stage, like this tree, it's better to leave more foliage so the tree has that natural need to keep pushing strongly through those veins. Along the way, when pushing to the top, the detours to assist a graft work better because there is that strong sap movement and energy exchange within the tree. With the graft lower down the detours are very natural....as long as the graft connection is clean and tightly bound. I probably think more in terms of the tree growing in the wild. In the wild, if I cut off top foliage, I think the tree would struggle to regain the strength of growth and probably kill off the grafts because they are not needed for survival. The concentration would be on regrowing and strengthening the top to live.

I also understand the cut back idea. The tree has a desire to grow...a need to produce foliage to reach for light and survive. With that in mind, the cut back of foliage would force the tree to direct a good amount of energy and sap to the graft for growth and survival. The tree wants to live...the tree has a reason to naturally support a tight well-fitted graft.

There....clearly I am not an expert that knows what needs to be done. But have my thoughts shared. I'm interested in hearing from Markyscott and what he thinks and plans to do. He has much more knowledge than I do...and he has the tree to build growth where he wants. I like the idea of his drawings (when he gets to them)...the drawings give me a snapshot of what he's thinking so comments can make better sense based on his direction and plan of action.

I like reading lots of thoughts on subjects though, diverse as they may be, they are all shared contributions. I liked hearing your foliage cut back thought. I had not thought that way until you said something. Thanks.
 
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#30
Hi Tieball. You know, I do drawings all the time, but I don't think I have for this one yet. Scott
Funny that I should comment on drawing....I really should do more drawings first myself. I need to make drawing more of a priority for me. Almost all my trees are pre-bonsai....growing in the ground for trunk growth. The end tree is not yet forming. I have sometimes drawn what I wish would happen. But more often collect photos of what might be possible as I watch the trunks growth.
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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#32
Speaking of drawing...
I'm drawn to the old foilage...
(this is not an anti graft ad campaign!)
I long for spring!

Nice...

@Tieball I like reading your posts!

@markyscott sorry I missed your reply on this. In 2014! Wow time!

This might be the thread that makes me go pro graft!

Sorce
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
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#35
You guys have me very intrigued.

Like it or not....

I'm a SOBS.

Sorce
 

Adair M

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#36
Is this scion work all from one tree or several grafted onto one stock?
Vance, the Ume graft onto his juniper is us just messing around.

On my tree, there were two approach grafts of two separate little Kishu rooted cuttings. The second picture was taken just after I cut off the pots.

Markyscott's tree got 5 grafts. Looks like one didn't take, so they grafted on another. His still have the pots with roots still attached hanging on the tree. On the four that are taking, some of the bark was scraped away between the roots in the little pots and the graft. Forcing the scions to use the Sierra trunk for nurishment.
 

Adair M

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#37
This picture of my tree shows an intermediate step:
image.jpeg

The grafts were put in, and the little pots hang in the tree for a year until the grafts take.
 
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#38
I am more curious about the scions used in the graft pictured on image 91335. Were these Shimp cuttings struck from the same stock?
 

Adair M

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#39
I am more curious about the scions used in the graft pictured on image 91335. Were these Shimp cuttings struck from the same stock?
That picture is of the original Sierra foliage. The graft is the twig of Ume. That graft was placed up high in the foliage that will be jinned once the grafts (not pictured) take. They are about 12 inches lower down.

The Ume graft is an inside joke. A year ago at Boon's I grafted a Shimpaku scion onto a plum tree. I didn't think it would take. But apparently it has! Here's the picture:

image.jpeg

So, today on Facebook, Boon posted a picture of Markyscott's Sierra juniper with the grafts, and I said "graft Ume on it", making a reference to my silly graft pictured above.

So, they did! We'll see if it takes.
 

markyscott

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#40
Maybe. But I am really far away from being any expert on the subject.

I have believed that in the early stage, like this tree, it's better to leave more foliage so the tree has that natural need to keep pushing strongly through those veins. Along the way, when pushing to the top, the detours to assist a graft work better because there is that strong sap movement and energy exchange within the tree. With the graft lower down the detours are very natural....as long as the graft connection is clean and tightly bound. I probably think more in terms of the tree growing in the wild. In the wild, if I cut off top foliage, I think the tree would struggle to regain the strength of growth and probably kill off the grafts because they are not needed for survival. The concentration would be on regrowing and strengthening the top to live.

I also understand the cut back idea. The tree has a desire to grow...a need to produce foliage to reach for light and survive. With that in mind, the cut back of foliage would force the tree to direct a good amount of energy and sap to the graft for growth and survival. The tree wants to live...the tree has a reason to naturally support a tight well-fitted graft.

There....clearly I am not an expert that knows what needs to be done. But have my thoughts shared. I'm interested in hearing from Markyscott and what he thinks and plans to do. He has much more knowledge than I do...and he has the tree to build growth where he wants. I like the idea of his drawings (when he gets to them)...the drawings give me a snapshot of what he's thinking so comments can make better sense based on his direction and plan of action.

I like reading lots of thoughts on subjects though, diverse as they may be, they are all shared contributions. I liked hearing your foliage cut back thought. I had not thought that way until you said something. Thanks.
Hi Tieball. So it's been a busy few days and I'm just catching up. To let you knew, the choice was to cut back the top growth. As the grafts had clearly taken, it was time to force the tree to rely more on the grafted foliage. Also on the approach grafts we scraped through the cambium on two sides to weaken the connection to the seedlings roots. I had scraped before and also tied a wire around the trunk. As the seedling grows it will be eventually girdled. As soon as we get good extension, we'll sever the connection entirely. I'm sure this will happen next season.

Scott