Abrupt Re-Direction of branches

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#1
I'm curious if such an operation, as shown in the image, would work, or not work if I wished to 'abruptly' re-direct a branch? Branch Redirect.jpg
 

Dav4

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#2
I'm curious if such an operation, as shown in the image, would work, or not work if I wished to 'abruptly' re-direct a branch? View attachment 224796
It can be done with conifers, and perhaps some tropicals. I wouldn't try this with a maple.
 
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#3
There is a video of Ryan Neil doing that to a sylvestris pine somewhere.
But the pine did not survive the procedure (unless someone just forgot to post a follow up in +/-6 years of active youtube comments).

I think it could work, but I am not going to risk it. If the professionals fail sometimes, then I'll fail all of the times.
 
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#4
I'm thinking Chinese Elm for this one. I have one that has some really neat, evil, Halloween'ish character to some of it's naturally crazy branching. To be able to do this, artificially, to just one more branch, that mother nature failed to wickedly form, on her own, would make it just right! ;)
 

Dav4

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#5
I'm thinking Chinese Elm for this one. I have one that has some really neat, evil, Halloween'ish character to some of it's naturally crazy branching. To be able to do this, artificially, to just one more branch, that mother nature failed to wickedly form, on her own, would make it just right! ;)
SNAPPP!
 
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#6
I'm thinking Chinese Elm for this one. I have one that has some really neat, evil, Halloween'ish character to some of it's naturally crazy branching. To be able to do this, artificially, to just one more branch, that mother nature failed to wickedly form, on her own, would make it just right! ;)
Clip and grow is probably your best way to imitate the natural development of the other branches
 

0soyoung

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#7
I'm curious if such an operation, as shown in the image, would work, or not work if I wished to 'abruptly' re-direct a branch View attachment 224796
It can be done because, as long as there is a continuous line of cambium, it can 'heal'. The union across the cut, however, will be mechanically weak for a long time, Hence, it is most suitable for redirecting a branch downward, where gravity will tend to hold the cut surfaces together. Conversely, it is not a good way to redirect a branch abruptly upward,

If you are going to try such stuff, I suggest that you wire the branch first, then make the cut. There is a lot of jiggling involved in wiring that all too easily damages what cambium is left.

Further, if you want to make such abrupt redirects, I think it works out better to just bend the wired branch to the point it snaps, then promptly cover the break with parafilm or saran (remove the saran after 15 days or so). Alternatively, wrap the branch with self-amalgamating silicone tape (from big box or auto parts stores), then wire, then bend to snap, if you are doing this by plan/expectation. These films will prevent desiccation of the exposed cambium by the break and, in a sense, promote rapid healing.
 
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#8
I don't know if it works with pine. I will attempt and report the results. In my youth I saw a penjing master do V notch many times with ficus in multiple directions to branches up to 6 inch in diameter. He set up the cables and turnbuckles ahead of time. Then he cut the V and pull the branch to close. When the sides started to touch, he used a thin kerf pull saw to repeatedly cut right at the seam, cleaning the saw often. He told me that's the way to make a tight seam. When the seam was closed tight, he rubbed fresh sap from the rubber tree to seal and then he put on a steel splint and wrapped it tight with cloth. The branch was then kept kept in place for a year. Most of them survived but I also saw some died.
 
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