Acer P leaves

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
Hey look, I made another leaf thread about my maple! Bloody thing...
Apparently it is just never happy!

Anyways, what do people think of this..

79CF6B56-3E7D-4FBA-92A4-0FF106FC3161.jpg 69F3DFA8-D968-4BAD-B514-83B3C2E1026C.jpg 7BE1D373-3E3A-431B-A36C-5A228EDA651E.jpg

Leaves seemed more hardened off now, not as pale.
It's being fertilised with miracle grow liquid fert, with some seaweed extract, once a week.
It also has some (although mostly worn out now) organic pellet fert.
The discolouration of the leaves is different to previous issues.. some parts of dying leaf are not just at the edges, but spots in middle, very few but still.

All I'm thinking at the moment is fert burn.. but it's also been a bit windy, tried very hard to shield it from that. Also it's in completely inorganic substrate, hence why I fertilise once a week, it runs out pretty quick.
 

Giga

Masterpiece
Messages
3,808
Reaction score
4,606
Location
Virginia beach, VA
USDA Zone
7-8
Yep this is common. I don't think is fertilizer burn. It's just the nature of maples. So many environmental factors beyond our control can affect maples. I think your tree is just well.... fine!
I'm just going to 2nd this, it looks fine. You may want to use a systematic if your really worried plus a 12month one is good of practice anyway.
 

j evans

Chumono
Messages
987
Reaction score
839
Location
Yakima, WA
USDA Zone
6B
That's the way we are, either over babying it or sticking it in the corner and forgetting about. You just can't win. I think that it is OK, but what do I know?
 

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
Yep this is common. I don't think is fertilizer burn. It's just the nature of maples. So many environmental factors beyond our control can affect maples. I think your tree is just well.... fine!
I'm just going to 2nd this, it looks fine. You may want to use a systematic if your really worried plus a 12month one is good of practice anyway.
Thank you for the replies. You've put my mind at rest! Maybe due to its previous problems, I simply thought the worst.
This is gonna sound silly but google was no help cos the word is too general, so I have to ask.. what's a systematic? Lol. Systematic fert? 12 month, what?
I think you were probably typing it short hand, just gotta dumb it down for me ;).

I don't see a thing wrong with this Maple's leaves. It might be a time to add a few more trees so you are being a helicopter parent to this one!
Thanks Eric, glad to hear you say it. I've been told I'm babying trees, you aren't wrong, as much as I try not to.
I actually have a Katade-Mochi size pyaracantha tree on the way now, from Germany. It's by no means anything special, but I really liked it and it's price was good. So I'm building the collection :).

That's the way we are, either over babying it or sticking it in the corner and forgetting about. You just can't win. I think that it is OK, but what do I know?
Yes it's true. Your comment gives me the feeling you may think your opinion isn't as valid, for some reason? Even if inexperienced (not saying you are), your opinion is still valid on the forum, I wouldn't worry about it not being :).
My maple is fine and ok, words which are entirely unflattering but it has a lot work left to do on it before it starts. I've barely touched it since purchase, a year ago. It's just been repotted, growing, recovering.. autumn it'll get the big work and then it'll truly start its journey, in my eyes.
 

Giga

Masterpiece
Messages
3,808
Reaction score
4,606
Location
Virginia beach, VA
USDA Zone
7-8
Messages
1,629
Reaction score
2,425
Location
Belgium
There was a period of unusual warm weather with no wind. Followed by a period with high winds. This is damage you see a lot on maples. With more developed maples you want to show, you have to protect them more from the elements. In this case i don't see any problem.
 

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
There was a period of unusual warm weather with no wind. Followed by a period with high winds. This is damage you see a lot on maples. With more developed maples you want to show, you have to protect them more from the elements. In this case i don't see any problem.
Yeh that's completely correct and what we had.. the Acer P leaves are so delicate, just learning that more and more. I will get better protection at some point.

Maybe you can dispel a worry of mine.. I'm not in the sunniest isle but I worry that when protecting my maple or trees, they are under cover and don't get sun through it so I think I'm doing it a small bit

Thanks for that info :)
 

LanceMac10

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,321
Reaction score
12,689
Location
Nashua, NH U.S.A.
USDA Zone
5
I don't 100% understand.. lol.
Trying to say I'm being too hard on my maple? :p

Yep this is common. I don't think is fertilizer burn. It's just the nature of maples. So many environmental factors beyond our control can affect maples. I think your tree is just well.... fine!

I'm just going to 2nd this, it looks fine. You may want to use a systematic if your really worried plus a 12month one is good of practice anyway.

I don't see a thing wrong with this Maple's leaves. It might be a time to add a few more trees so you are being a helicopter parent to this one!


JM leaves can get damaged pretty easy/quickly, like in an afternoon. Most all of the developing material here pouts the spring following a re-pot. More established rootballs seem to handle this better but this is purely anecdotal.;):cool::cool:
Maybe the roots are having a hard time keeping up with the foliage. Did you get it to wilt a bit yet? Sometimes it's good to actually see how much water is being retained/how long to dry....:eek::D:D:D




Of course, maybe you are giving it a bit of a complex.....:confused::D:D:D:D:D:D
 
Messages
1,629
Reaction score
2,425
Location
Belgium
In our wet and variable climate watering and protecting maples has to be spot on, i've been experimenting for 3 years with maples now, so limited experience. Give to much water in the wet and cold period in the beginning of spring will make roots "lazy", or rotten in the worst case. During the hot spells we occasionally get, only the established rootball that receives adequate moisture and / or protection will give you undamaged leaves. In all the rest of the cases, damage is inevitable. I start my maples in greenhouse until may 15 (last frost date), then they go outside and get shaded (70%) (i would like 50% better, but could not find that in small quantity) on days above 25°C and watered twice a day, and environment kept humid whenever possible. First year in free draining mix can be a challenge since maples don't like fluctuations of humidity. Covering with sphagnum helps a great deal. Your maple is healthy, but has stopped growing for this spring if you don't do anything. That's not a bad thing, because it will gain power for next years to come. It's a bit late, but you can induce a second flush by removing more than 50% of the leaves. (adjust watering) The goal is to keep them growing until the end of July.
 

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
JM leaves can get damaged pretty easy/quickly, like in an afternoon. Most all of the developing material here pouts the spring following a re-pot. More established rootballs seem to handle this better but this is purely anecdotal.;):cool::cool:
Maybe the roots are having a hard time keeping up with the foliage. Did you get it to wilt a bit yet? Sometimes it's good to actually see how much water is being retained/how long to dry....:eek::D:D:D




Of course, maybe you are giving it a bit of a complex.....:confused::D:D:D:D:D:D
Not seen wilting no but I wouldn't be trying to induce it. Lol
It's in completely inorganic substrate and it's watered daily, unless it rains. Following a more Walter P schedule, aggressive watering and fertilising. So water shouldn't be as much of a problem.
I did barely any root pruning when reporting this spring, but that was recent.

In our wet and variable climate watering and protecting maples has to be spot on, i've been experimenting for 3 years with maples now, so limited experience. Give to much water in the wet and cold period in the beginning of spring will make roots "lazy", or rotten in the worst case. During the hot spells we occasionally get, only the established rootball that receives adequate moisture and / or protection will give you undamaged leaves. In all the rest of the cases, damage is inevitable. I start my maples in greenhouse until may 15 (last frost date), then they go outside and get shaded (70%) (i would like 50% better, but could not find that in small quantity) on days above 25°C and watered twice a day, and environment kept humid whenever possible. First year in free draining mix can be a challenge since maples don't like fluctuations of humidity. Covering with sphagnum helps a great deal. Your maple is healthy, but has stopped growing for this spring if you don't do anything. That's not a bad thing, because it will gain power for next years to come. It's a bit late, but you can induce a second flush by removing more than 50% of the leaves. (adjust watering) The goal is to keep them growing until the end of July.
Thanks for the info. It's a bit unsettling that you reckon it's stopped growing already then :/. What would I do to help it continue till later in July?

It was repotted this spring so it won't grow as well it should next year, that im ok with. For that same reason I wouldn't feel comfortable defoliating to any degree. I could certainly put some sphagnum on top though, that'd be easy for me. Aside from help with water retention, what other benefits have you seen that have with your maples?

I think patience is best here atm because it didn't have a good time last year and it's been repotted this year so I'll opt for the sensible but slow process of time. Time for roots to establish, gain health and vigor. In autumn it's gonna get its first major work then it'll have 1 year in a pot, starting next spring, a whole year to grow and go about its business :).
 
Messages
1,629
Reaction score
2,425
Location
Belgium
Not watering when it is raining is not a good parameter. Often it does not rain enough and the toplayer seems wet. Some trees have so much leaves the soil don't even become wet. Besides that, watering does pull in oxygen to the roots. Rain, since slow, doesn't really. So even in periods of rain i do water (in spring). Late summer less so. Keep the region where your roots are now in mind. That is the portion where you want it to be damp. Next year when you don't repot you need to slightly adjust your thinking and watering. Sphagnum makes it easier to establish that damp area 1 or 2 cm beneath the soil-line where the roots should be.
The tree has at the end of the branch 2 leaves with no growing tip in between, the colour is uniform dark green. It is normal for late spring. It is also normal for trees that had any stress this spring (too cold, too wet, too warm, too dry, ...). When you have several maples you can compare them. By removing leaves (partial) early in spring, there will be interior buds growing by this time of year, so new growth will take over. You are right that since the history of this tree, patience is a good path to walk on.
 

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
Not watering when it is raining is not a good parameter. Often it does not rain enough and the toplayer seems wet. Some trees have so much leaves the soil don't even become wet. Besides that, watering does pull in oxygen to the roots. Rain, since slow, doesn't really. So even in periods of rain i do water (in spring). Late summer less so. Keep the region where your roots are now in mind. That is the portion where you want it to be damp. Next year when you don't repot you need to slightly adjust your thinking and watering. Sphagnum makes it easier to establish that damp area 1 or 2 cm beneath the soil-line where the roots should be.
The tree has at the end of the branch 2 leaves with no growing tip in between, the colour is uniform dark green. It is normal for late spring. It is also normal for trees that had any stress this spring (too cold, too wet, too warm, too dry, ...). When you have several maples you can compare them. By removing leaves (partial) early in spring, there will be interior buds growing by this time of year, so new growth will take over. You are right that since the history of this tree, patience is a good path to walk on.

Sorry, I do use my own intuitive as well when it comes to watering or not, after rain. Not just any rain, I activiley think about it :). But your points are well appreciated. About watering slow, not aerating the root system as much, very interesting.
Would you recommend sphagnum then, for this tree or it's doing perfectly well without?

I'm glad you agree with my patience approach, given it's history.
Seeing as the trees leaves died off last year, I didn't get to see it's autumn colours. I hope these leaves survive long enough and are healthy enough to deliver them this year.
Thanks for your posts and information Dirk, very informative.
 

LanceMac10

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
5,321
Reaction score
12,689
Location
Nashua, NH U.S.A.
USDA Zone
5
It's not sited where it is in the picture, is it? Right down on the concrete?
 

ConorDash

Omono
Messages
1,989
Reaction score
1,920
Location
Essex, UK, Zone 8
It's not sited where it is in the picture, is it? Right down on the concrete?
Where what is? Totally thrown me off, I've no idea what you are talking about! Lol.

Sphagnum never hurts, concrete does.
Lol you make an infallible point there! (Love that word, never get to use it).
My only thing with the sphagnum, talking seriously for a moment, is that I don't want to mess up watering experience. Don't want to continue watering as normal but due to the moss, it's keeping too damp and too wet..
 
Messages
1,629
Reaction score
2,425
Location
Belgium
Only put sphagnum where you want it to be damp. This is were new roots must come. The rest you leave open so you can judge watering. It is correct you have to monitor watering. Sphagnum will keep the medium under it more moist. Not wet, because the excess moisture drains away. Never seen rotted roots under sphagnum, sometime small roots grow up in the moss.
 

Similar threads


Top Bottom