Acer palmatum beni tsukasa (from cutting)

leatherback

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
8,833
Reaction score
14,244
Location
Northern Germany
USDA Zone
7
Above this, anybody can represent a Bonsai with a different shape/look, even if it doesn't look natural.
I think that even if it looks man-made initially, in a decade or so it will have gained age and patina and I think it will look very natural.
My 2p.
 

stu929

Mame
Messages
214
Reaction score
202
Location
Central PA, USA
USDA Zone
6B
Beautiful japanese maple from the Phipps Conservatory. I couldn't find a tag but none of the large maples they had were close to straight.

Love the progression. Want to see how this ends up. I'm just starting and long term progression threads are very helpful to me.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20201107_142153849_HDR.jpg
    IMG_20201107_142153849_HDR.jpg
    405.9 KB · Views: 33

clem

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
829
Location
Normandy, France
Today, i removed the ground of the nebari, to look at it and eventually to order young cuttings if the nebari lack of roots (in order to make thread grafts eventually).

The front nebari is nice, thanks to my palmatum cuttings producer (his knowledge and experience allows to produce palmatum cuttings with a lot of roots -> good nebari) ->
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2021 01 05 001.JPG
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2021 01 05 002.JPG

The back side of the nebari isn't as good as the front nebari, but i don't think it will need graftings to improve, because there are already roots emerging at the right places (white arrows) so i just plan to cut the roots under those surface roots to stimulate their growth and thickening (white arrows) during next spring ->
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2021 01 05 003virt.jpg
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2021 01 05 004.JPG
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2021 01 05 005.JPG

i can't wait to be next spring to repot this tree and raise its nebari to make it more visible :D
 

BobbyLane

Masterpiece
Messages
3,513
Reaction score
11,427
Location
London, England
Looks awesome, great job. how long did you say you've been doing bonsai again?:D
the low hanging, ground hugging branches look very convincing, im inspired now to try this on a Hornbeam i have. are you going to try to root any of those?
 

clem

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
829
Location
Normandy, France
Looks awesome, great job. how long did you say you've been doing bonsai again?:D
the low hanging, ground hugging branches look very convincing, im inspired now to try this on a Hornbeam i have. are you going to try to root any of those?
i do Bonsai since 1990 , it is my friend and neighbor who began doing Bonsai so i tried too (it was the beginng of Bonsai in France when everybody thought it was easy and every Bonsai died, even the imported Bonsai in "pro" nursery because nobody knew how to grow them)

Here is a pic of my Bonsai (boxwood) in 1993 : i used to cultivate them in the shade in a barn = not good at all) so none of those trees survived ->
BUIS EN 1993.JPG

I cultivate more correctly my trees since 5 years, thanks to forums advises, youtube videos and magasines. To cultivate correctly and to keep the tree alive/healthy is the main task of Bonsai for me !! I killed so many trees

Concerning the hanging right branch, your idea to make it root in the soil is interesting.. I'm sure this branch will fall down on the soil, and then bounce back to go up again (like the famous oak tree) but i dunno if it will root by itself or if i will make it root (but it is an interesting idea) ->
acer palmatum beni tsukasa 2018 08 16 001virt2.jpg
 

BobbyLane

Masterpiece
Messages
3,513
Reaction score
11,427
Location
London, England
ah i see from 1990, i did remember you saying 5 years somewhere so makes sense.
yeh the deciduous trees will route low hanging branches often.
i ofen get hornbeams where there the low branches had produced roots, the low branches on these had sent out roots before i bought them
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20210105-125803_eBay.jpg
    Screenshot_20210105-125803_eBay.jpg
    143.9 KB · Views: 22
  • Screenshot_20210105-125715_eBay.jpg
    Screenshot_20210105-125715_eBay.jpg
    114.6 KB · Views: 24

Arlithrien

Shohin
Messages
274
Reaction score
294
Location
Tampa, FL
USDA Zone
9b
Impressive growth, and your vision for an old weeping oak has been shaping up nicely.
 

Mycin

Mame
Messages
206
Reaction score
246
Location
Chicago
USDA Zone
5b
Very impressive to see you bring your artistic vision to life! Thank you for sharing
 

clem

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
829
Location
Normandy, France
ah i see from 1990, i did remember you saying 5 years somewhere so makes sense.
yeh the deciduous trees will route low hanging branches often.
i ofen get hornbeams where there the low branches had produced roots, the low branches on these had sent out roots before i bought them
the tree on the right has already a great base & nebari :cool:
 

ConorDash

Masterpiece
Messages
2,496
Reaction score
2,704
Location
Essex, UK
USDA Zone
8b
I pruned that tree yesterday, but there are still sacrifice branches. The fall colors are now more "red" ->
View attachment 338861
After pruning ->
View attachment 338862

@Davidlpf i made a virtual to show were i plan to cut (next summer or in 2 years) ->
View attachment 338863

Virtual after the cut (the secondary branches will grow and continue the development of the branches and apex) ->
View attachment 338864

My inspiration branches are the one of ash trees near to my home (fraxinus).. The branches get movement because the main branches growing down slowly get weaker and weaker, and then die, and the secondary branch growing up developps and get bigger & bigger ->
View attachment 338865
View attachment 338866
View attachment 338867

Beautifull branches with a lot of rythm (curves and breaks). I'd love to have this on my tree ->
View attachment 338868

Going really great, you make it look easy :).

Can I ask, the cut back. Why not cut them back completely to the desired place? Have you let them longer to continue thickening, or just cut back for back budding? But if all you want is back budding, why not prune the branches back fully to where you want, now? They dont look like they need thickening anymore, if that was the goal, in my opinion.

Really lovely looking roots under that substrate. Well done, clearly all you are doing, is working.
 
Last edited:

Grovic

Mame
Messages
129
Reaction score
128
Location
Bloomfield Hills, MI
USDA Zone
6a
Thanks James, i hope it will be better with time !
Here are pics of the developpement of the leaves of this cultivar ->

March 31 ->
View attachment 296047

08 April (the white color on the leaves is the bordeaux mixture) ->
View attachment 296048
The tree the 08 of April ->
View attachment 296049

The leaves & the tree today (14 april) ->
View attachment 296050

View attachment 296051
That's one sweet nebari, love the tree.
 

clem

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
829
Location
Normandy, France
Going really great, you make it look easy :).

Can I ask, the cut back. As you've still left the branches long for more sacrifice, why not, not prune them at all? So they would thicken faster, although perhaps you cut back to still get slow thickening (if thats what you are aiming for, I dont think its needed) but also get back budding? But if all you want is back budding, why not prune the branches back fully to where you want, now?

Really lovely looking roots under that substrate. Well done, clearly all you are doing, is working.
thank you.
I answer to your question, if i understood correctly.
I plan to let the primary branches grow more this year and maybe next year. And when the diameter is enough, i plan to cut them and do clip&grow to get better movement (to remove the repetitive sinusoid curves) and to get branches with taper/conicity. The small secondary branches are now inhibited by the terminal buds of the primary branches and the shadow of the leaves in summer... but as soon as the primary branche will be cut, the terminal buds of the small secondary branches will recieve all the sapp of the main branch.. so they will grow very much and they will thicken very quick. Those young secondary branches will quick become quite thick in a few years, that's why i want the primary branches to thicken more before to cut. The small secondary branches will quickly catch up with their thickness. What i don't know is whether to cut in 1 time directly or to cut by steps above the secondary branches, in order to not let the sapp go too quick too much inside those secondary branche and get very long inter-nodes. Never donne that before so i dunno what's the best option. i think i will cut by step reducing the main primary branche slowly (?)
 

BobbyLane

Masterpiece
Messages
3,513
Reaction score
11,427
Location
London, England
i do Bonsai since 1990 , it is my friend and neighbor who began doing Bonsai so i tried too (it was the beginng of Bonsai in France when everybody thought it was easy and every Bonsai died, even the imported Bonsai in "pro" nursery because nobody knew how to grow them)

Here is a pic of my Bonsai (boxwood) in 1993 : i used to cultivate them in the shade in a barn = not good at all) so none of those trees survived ->
View attachment 347828

I cultivate more correctly my trees since 5 years, thanks to forums advises, youtube videos and magasines. To cultivate correctly and to keep the tree alive/healthy is the main task of Bonsai for me !! I killed so many trees

Concerning the hanging right branch, your idea to make it root in the soil is interesting.. I'm sure this branch will fall down on the soil, and then bounce back to go up again (like the famous oak tree) but i dunno if it will root by itself or if i will make it root (but it is an interesting idea) ->
View attachment 347830

i will try it and post the tree in another thread. i think if one could get a branch to root, it will also thicken up considerably faster, im going to try it on a spindly low branch that is sort of off to the rear.
its common on old trees in the wild, heavy low branches often hit the soil, root and continue to rise back up. its something ive always wanted to try.
 

clem

Shohin
Messages
462
Reaction score
829
Location
Normandy, France
i will try it and post the tree in another thread. i think if one could get a branch to root, it will also thicken up considerably faster, im going to try it on a spindly low branch that is sort of off to the rear.
its common on old trees in the wild, heavy low branches often hit the soil, root and continue to rise back up. its something ive always wanted to try.
Not sure but the risk is maybe to get a reverse taper on the branche downstream the roots, as the roots will make the branche thicken downstream ?
__palm2.jpg
 

BobbyLane

Masterpiece
Messages
3,513
Reaction score
11,427
Location
London, England
here is a closer look at the hornbeam i posted above. it was deeper, which had caused the branch to root.
i wouldnt really be worried about any bulges at the soil line tbh, anyway this demonstrates its possible on carps

there were more roots coming off the base of that branch that i cut off to make it more presentable.
20210105_150324.jpg

im not keeping this one, in fact its already been sold but had i kept it i would of used a pot wide enough to run the branch on the soil line.

this would also give the tree an illusion of a wider base.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom