Air Layering Crimson Queen?

TreeofBloodgood

Seedling
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Hi, I’m Dane,

This is my first post here, so tell me if I’m doing something wrong.
Anyway, I recently got a grafted Japanese Maple ‘Crimson Queen’ from my local garden center, and I have a couple questions about it.
First off I live in Zone 10 (a or b, I don’t know), Glendale, LA County, in SoCal. I know this isn’t the ideal zone, but are there any pro-tips for keeping JM’s alive here?
Secondly, I read that palmatums air-layer very well, but dissectum varieties... not so much. Is this true? If so, can Crimson Queens be air-layered, or is this a lost cause? Right now, the temperatures are fluctuating between 70-80°F, if that’s of any use. Also, are air-layers weaker than grafted specimens?

Well, those are all my questions. Thanks for taking the time to read this! Any answers would be appreciated.
Have a nice day,


—D.E.
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CasAH

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Crimson Queen is a weeping dissectum, weeping Japanese maples are hard to airlayer, as you said dissectum are also less successful at air layering. So it maybe difficult to airlayer if not impossible.

I have one in front of the house in the landscape, random branches die throughout the year. Not a good characteristic for Bonsai.
 

papymandarin

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i don't know where the graft of your is, but if i had to air-layer one of those i would do it just below the graft so as to have roots from the regular palmatum and hope to "blend" the graft union into the flare of the nebari. Those varieties are slow growing even when grafted and usually don't layer well if at all, and are from weak to unable to survive long term on their own roots.
 

TreeofBloodgood

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i don't know where the graft of your is, but if i had to air-layer one of those i would do it just below the graft so as to have roots from the regular palmatum and hope to "blend" the graft union into the flare of the nebari. Those varieties are slow growing even when grafted and usually don't layer well if at all, and are from weak to unable to survive long term on their own roots.
Yes, I was thinking I could air-layer the rootstock, but it has no branches. Is there a way I could induce branch growth without risking damage to the whole tree?
 

TreeofBloodgood

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Oh yeah, and one more question. What is a good rootstock variety? The most vigorous, hardy, heat tolerant, and sturdiest Japanese maples?
 

Japonicus

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Oh yeah, and one more question. What is a good rootstock variety? The most vigorous, hardy, heat tolerant, and sturdiest Japanese maples?
Hi Dane. This would be a great time to edit your profile to include your location and USDA grow zone.
Green leafed Acer Palmatum is broadly used for rootstock and hardy.
Trick may be to match root stock growth to cultivar growth habit to avoid obvious graft union that is accentuated with time.
 

TreeofBloodgood

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Hi Dane. This would be a great time to edit your profile to include your location and USDA grow zone.
Green leafed Acer Palmatum is broadly used for rootstock and hardy.
Trick may be to match root stock growth to cultivar growth habit to avoid obvious graft union that is accentuated with time.
Thanks Japonicus! I looked it up, and found out I am in 10a (Glendale, California).
I’ll do some research and find good green-leafed cultivars for my area. Thanks!
 

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