Air layering Japanese Larch

Waldo

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Can Japanese Larch be Air layered ? If so, when is the best time to do so. Thanks for any advice.
 

Jorgens86

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Its possible but it can take 2 seasons before you can seperate it.
 

AJL

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Depends on your local climate.
I managed to do one in here in the balmy climate of English West Midlands in 12 months! Sorry I didnt keep the photos!
 

Jorgens86

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Well lets see how mine is doing. I started air layer in midle of may.
 

AJL

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I think I started mine Mid May too!( it was 5 years ago) and I was amazed how well it rooted
 

Waldo

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Well lets see how mine is doing. I started air layer in midle of may.
How'd it look Jorgens ? I didn't think they would show much in that short of a time. I thought it took a year or more. I am using a clear container. There is a lot of condensation. Not much air in the container me thinks .
How important is it to have air in there ? How do you know how much air, if any, and when it needs more moisture ?? This is a first for me.
 

Shibui

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If you have not used clay or mud there should be plenty of air in the layer. Clear container is good to monitor moisture. If there's no condensation it needs some water. I assume there is a way for excess water to drain out? So many different possibilities for air layering. Some photos of yours would help us to give better advice.
A location in your profile also helps get better info suited to your specific conditions.
 

Jorgens86

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How'd it look Jorgens ? I didn't think they would show much in that short of a time. I thought it took a year or more. I am using a clear container. There is a lot of condensation. Not much air in the container me thinks .
How important is it to have air in there ? How do you know how much air, if any, and when it needs more moisture ?? This is a first for me.
Well iv done only this spring so will see how its doing. Iwill check if there is any roots in september.
 

Waldo

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If you have not used clay or mud there should be plenty of air in the layer. Clear container is good to monitor moisture. If there's no condensation it needs some water. I assume there is a way for excess water to drain out? So many different possibilities for air layering. Some photos of yours would help us to give better advice.
A location in your profile also helps get better info suited to your specific conditions.
I am located in zone 5B. The container is filled with spagum moss but its very fine, not a lot of air gaps . I did not put in a drain hole. I wonder if that would help or allow moisture to escape too rapidly. I'm not sure how I will introduce more moisture when necessary . Possibly inject it. Open to any ideas, suggestions, or success stories. Larch .jpgLarch 2.png
 

Shibui

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Air gaps do not need to be big. Lots of smaller spaces still gives good aeration. It looks very dark in the container. Did you use sphagnum moss or peat? (sometimes called peat moss or sphagnum peat)
I see you have been very thorough about sealing it up. Leaving a small hole at the base for excess water to drain won't hurt. I do not seal mine anywhere near as well. Usually have some entry around the trunk so that rain and other water dribbling down the trunk will rehydrate if necessary. Just need to make sure there is an equal space at the base so it does not flood.
The condensation inside the container is a good sign that the container is not flooded. It show there is some air in there. I think it looks OK and would just leave it as is.
 

Waldo

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Air gaps do not need to be big. Lots of smaller spaces still gives good aeration. It looks very dark in the container. Did you use sphagnum moss or peat? (sometimes called peat moss or sphagnum peat)
I see you have been very thorough about sealing it up. Leaving a small hole at the base for excess water to drain won't hurt. I do not seal mine anywhere near as well. Usually have some entry around the trunk so that rain and other water dribbling down the trunk will rehydrate if necessary. Just need to make sure there is an equal space at the base so it does not flood.
The condensation inside the container is a good sign that the container is not flooded. It show there is some air in there. I think it looks OK and would just leave it as is.
You are correct. It is sphagnum peat. Is that a suitable medium for root development in air layering ? I did as you suggested and drilled a few holes at the bottom and a few at the top. A good suggestion.
I have also put it in an area that gets morning sun only. I thought this process might be more stressful in full sun. I am curious. if this process goes into the winter months Will this container of moss freeze into a cube.
Or will it have developed enough roots prior to winter freeze ? Thank you for your insight and suggestions. Still not sure how I managed to get this post on the wrong forum. Sorry about that .
 

Shibui

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I don't think many look at which forum the posts are in. That's more for ease of searching for specifics I guess and maybe some OCD nerds like things classified.
Sphagnum moss is the preferred medium for layers. It has good water holding, great air and also seems to have something that helps roots.
Others use bonsai mix or potting mix and some have other special brews for layers. Peat should be Ok though not my preferred option.

I don't get cold enough to have any insight into freezing layers. Most trees have some antifreeze properties to protect roots but each species does seem to have a lower limit of tolerance. Your layer should be at no more risk than the roots in the pot below so winter it as normal for your area I would guess if the layer is still on then but I hope you will be able to remove before then,
Good light will promote roots but you are right that too much sun produces stress and inhibits new roots. Morning sun should be fine.
Good luck, fingers crossed.
 

Waldo

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I don't think many look at which forum the posts are in. That's more for ease of searching for specifics I guess and maybe some OCD nerds like things classified.
Sphagnum moss is the preferred medium for layers. It has good water holding, great air and also seems to have something that helps roots.
Others use bonsai mix or potting mix and some have other special brews for layers. Peat should be Ok though not my preferred option.

I don't get cold enough to have any insight into freezing layers. Most trees have some antifreeze properties to protect roots but each species does seem to have a lower limit of tolerance. Your layer should be at no more risk than the roots in the pot below so winter it as normal for your area I would guess if the layer is still on then but I hope you will be able to remove before then,
Good light will promote roots but you are right that too much sun produces stress and inhibits new roots. Morning sun should be fine.
Good luck, fingers crossed.
You are probably correct . Also, I believe these Larches are tolerant to about -40F. Thanks for all your suggestions.
 

AJL

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Where in the world are you located? It might be helpful to update your profile with your location so that forum users know where youre at and can give more specific local advice
 

Waldo

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Where in the world are you located? It might be helpful to update your profile with your location so that forum users know where youre at and can give more specific local advice
I am in N. IL not far from the WI border. Zone 5B. I did mention that earlier in this post.
 

HorseloverFat

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I am in N. IL not far from the WI border. Zone 5B. I did mention that earlier in this post.
I think what they are trying to say is.. if you update the info.. then it is ALWAYS present.. then you wont have to explain yourself every single thread. AND you won’t be asked ever again. :)

Nice Larch!

I’m excited to see your results.
 
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