Alnus Incana (Grey Alder) #1

Orion_metalhead

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I had read that alder seeds would germinate simply by leaving them in water. Instead of doing any sort of additional stratification, I simply collected the seeds from the local trees here in February, took them home, shook em to get the seeds out and dumped a large quantity into a little jar of water. I left this by my window sill. Sure enough, I gave it a look today and one of the seeds had about an 1/8" root and had sunk to the bottom of the jar. There is at least one more seed that has sprouted a radicle as well that I can see but this all happened over the course of today. I'm curious to see how many more sprout!

Has anyone else tried this with other extremely small seeds that would float, regardless of if they were viable or not?

20190219_002757.jpg
 

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I gave it a look today and one of the seeds had about an 1/8" root and had sunk to the bottom of the jar. There is at least one more seed that has sprouted a radicle as well that I can see but this all happened over the course of today. I'm curious to see how many more sprout!
Most of the seeds died off... my fault really for improprely sowing them... but this one survived. Its small but will see where it goes.
There is some missing detail, but are you saying that more than two seeds sprouted and sank in the cup of water? Then you subsequently did something improper that killed all of them but this one?

I applaud you for trying something, putting a story to the test. BUT please fill out the story, if you are sharing - it interests me.
 

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They dampened off. After sprouting, i had about 7 or 8 seeds. The lack of light in my inside office I think made them grow too leggy and they couldnt support themselves, fell over, and dampened off. I may have kept them too wet. I was using standard seed potting mix which i changed over recently to the sifted fines of 8822 mixed with ground up sphagnum. Havent had any issues using that since.

The water germination worked fine and i got more seeds germinatiing that i didnt sow. Will try again this winter with new seeds and better seed germination setup.
 

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Update on "The Survivor" Alder.

20190707_112631.jpg
Starting to get some branching down low. Roots looking good growing from bottom of pot. Base starting to thicken. Going to get more seeds this winter and try germinating them later in season or in greenhouse setup using the same water germination method.
 

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20191019_122513.jpg
I wound up having to slip pot it into a slightly larger pot because the wind - or an animal - knocked the other pot over off the bench onto the deck where it broke. It didn't seem to care at all because the leaves never even wilted. Seems like an incredibly tough species to work with.
 

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Even though it may be far afield from your aims, I note how the low leaves continue to be much reduced in size which suggests that it could make into an interesting mini/mame. Regardless, congrats on your baby!!!
 

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I have no styling plans for this yet other than seeing it get healthy. I am going to grab more of these alder seeds this winter from the same spot and try to get a few more going. I see the leaves reducing nicely with ramification. I think I'm going to go for a natural looking style on this one but if the top get's all screwed up and I have to cut down low at some point, a mame tree wouldn't be out of the question. Either way, the trunk needs to thicken up a lot. I can't wait to see it's bark grey up.
 

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End of year. Did some minor cleanup.

Age: 1yr
Training: 1yr
Width: .43"
Height: 8"

Front:
20191110_155300.jpg

From right
20191110_155308.jpg

Back:
20191110_155319.jpg

From left:
20191110_155323.jpg
 

Orion_metalhead

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Yes, seems pretty much indestructible. Will be growing some more of these next year hopefully from seed. Seem to grow super fast and take well to pretty much anything you do to them.
 
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Yes, seems pretty much indestructible. Will be growing some more of these next year hopefully from seed. Seem to grow super fast and take well to pretty much anything you do to them.
Once established (in the ground) they can easily gain a cm of width a year in a decent spot. And they produce their own nitrogen via symbiotic relationship with fungi in their roots. So you don't really need to fert then either.
 

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The nitrogen nodules are something i hope to expose with the nebari. I use this tree's color as a benchmark for other deciduous to see if i need more fertilizer.

I know everyone ground grows, but i prefer to keep things potted or in grow boxes at best. I believe trunks bark up faster in a pot vs in ground. Will like to test this theory at some point.
 
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The nitrogen nodules are something i hope to expose with the nebari. I use this tree's color as a benchmark for other deciduous to see if i need more fertilizer.

I know everyone ground grows, but i prefer to keep things potted or in grow boxes at best. I believe trunks bark up faster in a pot vs in ground. Will like to test this theory at some point.
FYI the nitrogen nodules need to be underground I believe in order to live. I think it has to do with UV light. I could be wrong though.
 

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Interesting, but exposed they will remain no doubt, and add interest to the nebari, even if they are not actively creating nitrogen?
 
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Interesting, but exposed they will remain no doubt, and add interest to the nebari, even if they are not actively creating nitrogen?
Not sure 🤔
Just that all the wild alder I see here along the rivers (where their roots are exposed) have no nodules or else shrivelled nodules. Could be a coincidence or maybe not lol
 

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