American Beech - no likey literati?

B-rad in GR

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My girlfriend has heard me drone on about my love for the american beech and how I’d love one in my collection. An early xmas present arrived today. Fagus Grandifolia! So incredibly excited (also have several scoped out for collection in spring) ... however, I’m not sold on the literati approach here.
Is air layering difficult on fagus? Any thoughts on sticking with the style?
Bella bonsai purchased (NC), collected three years ago and in the same pot. It is a beautiful tree and curious on opinions. Obviously no work until spring but hard not to be excited.
 

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Ohmy222

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I’ve layered a European beech. You could probably layer it. Other option is chop it prior to spring. Young enough to take it I would think.
 

Hack Yeah!

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Following. I plan on trying a layer next year if you're patient enough to wait a year... maybe someone will chime in and confirm. I certainly see them throwing roots into the duff, so I figure they'll layer just fine
 

TN_Jim

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Keep it alive, figure out what makes it tick where you are. Some shade is ok, with little wind is not a bad thing, not saying the best, as have only collected them and apparently make them grow increasingly slower.
 

Orion_metalhead

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The bark is really the highlight, imo. It has this variegated look to it which emphasizes the trunk and is very interesting in the literati style. My concern is the patchieness may throw it out of scale?
 

augustine

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American beech is difficult and very slow for bonsai, huge leaves.

best to start with a thick trunk under any circumstances. Long long term project
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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American beech - yes, has a spotty record for air layering. I would not attempt to air layer this tree.

The tree in front of you, what is attractive about it? In my opinion, the long trunk, smooth bark and pleasant movement in the trunk. Chopping it, or air layering would pretty much eliminate the one feature of this tree that is attractive.

I would first - keep it as is, just let it grow out, then once a year prune back to keep it pretty much as is. Add only 2 or 3 internodes of length to branches each year.

Repot to a more attractive round pot. Let us see what the nebari looks like.

It may not meet the criteria for official "Literati", deciduous trees seldom make "good Literati", but it can make a nice slanting tree, as in leaning over a river bank, or stream bank. Not a good candidate for "windswept".

But this trunk is attractive - pot it to show off this trunk, keep the foliage minimal so one does not hide this attractive trunk.
 

ABCarve

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Warning for American beech is ...leaf disease. Discovered in near Cleveland, OH 2012, they don't even know if it's viral or bacterial, with no known cure. I'm near Erie, PA and all the beech in my woods have it including a bonsai I put in the compost heap. It's in Ontario ready to jump the border into Michigan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beech_leaf_disease.
 

B-rad in GR

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American beech - yes, has a spotty record for air layering. I would not attempt to air layer this tree.

The tree in front of you, what is attractive about it? In my opinion, the long trunk, smooth bark and pleasant movement in the trunk. Chopping it, or air layering would pretty much eliminate the one feature of this tree that is attractive.

I would first - keep it as is, just let it grow out, then once a year prune back to keep it pretty much as is. Add only 2 or 3 internodes of length to branches each year.

Repot to a more attractive round pot. Let us see what the nebari looks like.

It may not meet the criteria for official "Literati", deciduous trees seldom make "good Literati", but it can make a nice slanting tree, as in leaning over a river bank, or stream bank. Not a good candidate for "windswept".

But this trunk is attractive - pot it to show off this trunk, keep the foliage minimal so one does not hide this attractive trunk.
fantastic advice Leo! Thank you!
I still want to see the south haven beeches sometime!
Appreciate your input as always. I think this is the path I shall take given the air layering risk.
 

B-rad in GR

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Warning for American beech is ...leaf disease. Discovered in near Cleveland, OH 2012, they don't even know if it's viral or bacterial, with no known cure. I'm near Erie, PA and all the beech in my woods have it including a bonsai I put in the compost heap. It's in Ontario ready to jump the border into Michigan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beech_leaf_disease.
Yikes...
 

coh

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Warning for American beech is ...leaf disease. Discovered in near Cleveland, OH 2012, they don't even know if it's viral or bacterial, with no known cure. I'm near Erie, PA and all the beech in my woods have it including a bonsai I put in the compost heap. It's in Ontario ready to jump the border into Michigan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beech_leaf_disease.
Aw crap, yet another rapidly spreading tree killer. Hadn't heard about this one before but sounds like it could reach here in a couple of years. Guess I shouldn't get too attached to the European beech I acquired this year.
 

ABCarve

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Aw crap, yet another rapidly spreading tree killer. Hadn't heard about this one before but sounds like it could reach here in a couple of years. Guess I shouldn't get too attached to the European beech I acquired this year.
Maybe. I have a Japanese beech and it does put out a few suspicious leaves in the spring. I cut them off and so far it seems okay. It has never been in the ground. The American beech was collected here. Not sure if that makes a difference.
 

coh

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Maybe. I have a Japanese beech and it does put out a few suspicious leaves in the spring. I cut them off and so far it seems okay. It has never been in the ground. The American beech was collected here. Not sure if that makes a difference.
Guess time will tell. The information I saw indicated that Euro Beech was susceptible and that younger trees were more vulnerable or were likely to be killed quicker. Hopefully they can identify the cause, maybe we'll be able to protect trees if we find out in time.
 

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