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Hey friends,

I recently dug up this very interesting American Beech from the forests of West Virginia. I thought it had very interesting and beautiful features. i am not experienced with deadwood or much wiring though, and I don’t know if it has potential. What do you guys think? worth it? Any styling tips would be appreciated.BF287FB0-382F-4271-9E1C-4704B1D20336.jpeg353FA80C-D901-483F-BCD1-A5C52B60EABF.jpeg7D0A186C-CB5F-4A20-893B-6851748CC0FE.jpeg
 

Cmd5235

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Whatever you do, don’t touch the foliage this year. I’ve dug a lot of beech, and they can really suck when it comes to roots, as it looks like you’ve experienced. They tend to throw out long roots with feeders at the very end, or none at all. I hope that this tree will produce some roots to sustain itself, but I’m not sure this one will pull through. Please keep us updated
 

RKMcGinnis

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Has cool features. But bad timing to dig. I wouldn’t think it has a chance. But good luck. I don’t have any experience with what you have but you may want to cut into those huge roots and apply some rooting hormone and hope for a response. Keep the entire tree constantly wet. If there aren’t roots to absorb water to the tree it will die. I would be amazed if that lives.
 
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The only time of year I get to visit these forests is this week during the summer. I figured why not just rip it out and try it. I have not let the roots dry out since it’s been dug, so we’ll see. But if it dies, it dies.

If this tree were to hypothetically survive this transplant, does it look like it would be workable material? Is it even worth saving in the first place?
 

Zach Smith

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You need to bag this tree immediately (use one or more of those clear produce bags from the grocery store). If you don't, all of the moisture in the trunk will transpire out of the leaves and you've got a surely dead tree on your hands. The bag will keep the leaves under high humidity, and give roots a chance to grow.

Odd material, for sure. You never know how it might turn out.
 

BobbyLane

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The only time of year I get to visit these forests is this week during the summer. I figured why not just rip it out and try it. I have not let the roots dry out since it’s been dug, so we’ll see. But if it dies, it dies.

If this tree were to hypothetically survive this transplant, does it look like it would be workable material? Is it even worth saving in the first place?
it doesnt really have roots, for the tree to take in nutrients it needs feeder roots, fine feeder roots. what you have there is wood. if youre planning on digging more i would take suitable collecting tools, loads of videos on youtube, next time so you can get right underneath the rootball and collect feeder roots. if youre not sure what feeders roots are do a search.
 

Zach Smith

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With due respect, you don't need feeder roots when collecting American beech (or pretty much any North American native deciduous tree I can think of). The tree will gladly produce them from the larger lateral roots if you collect the tree at the right time. Beech has a very high success rate as well, at least 85% in my experience. Also, for tools you only need a sharp slim hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw. You should be able to saw a beech out of the ground in two or three minutes. Chop the trunk first. I have always cleaned the root zone completely, but have started leaving a little native soil. Be sure to seal the chop; not doing this will usually lead to failure due to moisture transpiring right through the chop point.
 

BobbyLane

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With due respect, you don't need feeder roots when collecting American beech (or pretty much any North American native deciduous tree I can think of). The tree will gladly produce them from the larger lateral roots if you collect the tree at the right time. Beech has a very high success rate as well, at least 85% in my experience. Also, for tools you only need a sharp slim hand saw or cordless reciprocating saw. You should be able to saw a beech out of the ground in two or three minutes. Chop the trunk first. I have always cleaned the root zone completely, but have started leaving a little native soil. Be sure to seal the chop; not doing this will usually lead to failure due to moisture transpiring right through the chop point.
fair enough Zach, with that in mind ive rarely seen any collected American beech on here, just a lot of failed attempts.
 

Zach Smith

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fair enough Zach, with that in mind ive rarely seen any collected American beech on here, just a lot of failed attempts.
No big deal, when I first started out I tried my best to lug an acre of dirt home with each tree. I figured out pretty quickly that there weren't any feeder roots there anyway, and if I left the lateral roots too long I have to chop them again to get the tree in a bonsai pot. Now I do it the lazy man's way. Saw 'em out of the ground! No mercy.

Here's an American beech I collected a couple of years ago. No feeders came with it :cool:
Beech5-21-21-3.JPG
 

BobbyLane

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No big deal, when I first started out I tried my best to lug an acre of dirt home with each tree. I figured out pretty quickly that there weren't any feeder roots there anyway, and if I left the lateral roots too long I have to chop them again to get the tree in a bonsai pot. Now I do it the lazy man's way. Saw 'em out of the ground! No mercy.

Here's an American beech I collected a couple of years ago. No feeders came with it :cool:
View attachment 383200
I do like your approach, if it aint broke dont fix it! maybe next time im out in the woods or park ill keep a hand saw handy, timing is key of course, ill keep it in mind.
 

RKMcGinnis

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No big deal, when I first started out I tried my best to lug an acre of dirt home with each tree. I figured out pretty quickly that there weren't any feeder roots there anyway, and if I left the lateral roots too long I have to chop them again to get the tree in a bonsai pot. Now I do it the lazy man's way. Saw 'em out of the ground! No mercy.

Here's an American beech I collected a couple of years ago. No feeders came with it :cool:
View attachment 383200
This gives me hope for this beech I want to remove from the woods in the back of my place.

What is the best time of the year would you advise? I was originally going to do it in early spring when the buds swell.
 

leatherback

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The tree will gladly produce them from the larger lateral roots if you collect the tree at the right time.
At the right time being key.

Most deciduous species will grow feeders willingly if you collect at the, for that species, right timeslot. I have collected a few beeches (F Sylvatica) and only once had problems. That was collected and froze to the core for 3 weeks 2 days later.
 

Zach Smith

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This gives me hope for this beech I want to remove from the woods in the back of my place.

What is the best time of the year would you advise? I was originally going to do it in early spring when the buds swell.
I would recommend lifting before the buds swell. With American beech I think you have a bigger window during winter - years ago I collected one in December and it came through fine. But my usual timing is January through March.
 

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