American Hornbeam and Trident Maple

RyanFrye

Chumono
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I've been looking for American Hornbeam (Carpinus Caroliniana) but can't seem to find it on-line from a reputable dealer. I have found Trident Maples for sale on-line, but I'd rather buy from someone on the board...keep'n it in the family!

Let me know if you have any for sale or know where I can get'em. By the way, I'm in Zone 9 and would prefer to get stock that is from my zone or not too far off from it. Plants seem to do better when raised in similar climate (or maybe I just think that;) )
 
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florida
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Ryan,
I have a nice Carpinus Caroliniana at my place. It is about 18 inches tall with a 2-2 1/2 diameter trunk. If you would like to see it, give me a call and you can see it. I wasn't going to sell it originally, but since you are looking for one and I need to downsize, maybe we could work out a decent price?

Unfortunately, it is not really in a pot yet. I have it in its current home, a small plastic cat litter box:p:D

MEEOOW!
 

RyanFrye

Chumono
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Florida
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Ryan,
I have a nice Carpinus Caroliniana at my place. It is about 18 inches tall with a 2-2 1/2 diameter trunk. If you would like to see it, give me a call and you can see it. I wasn't going to sell it originally, but since you are looking for one and I need to downsize, maybe we could work out a decent price?

Unfortunately, it is not really in a pot yet. I have it in its current home, a small plastic cat litter box:p:D

MEEOOW!
LOL...I'll give you a call.
 

johng

Omono
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Collecting Hornbeam

Hornbeam is a species that should be very easy to collect in your neck of the woods if you are interested. Typically it is found very near water. In SC I often find it not directly next to a stream, river, or lake but maybe 1.5-2' in elevation above the normal water line. It is very easy to spot due to musculature of the trunk and typically smooth grey bark. My buddy Ken has a tree he bought from someone in Florida that they called a Florida Hornbeam...it actually seems to have slightly better characteristics for bonsai than Carolina Hornbeam...smaller leaves mainly. I have collected horn beams at all times of the year with decent success. I am sure Early spring is probably the best time but with a little care success is even possible in the mid summer. Seedlings can be easily collected and even sometimes just pulled right out of the ground...due to the very hard nature of the mature wood (one of the common names is ironwood) I would strongly suggest a saw for cutting the roots on bigger material as opposed to a shovel.

I collected two trunks this spring and about 45 seedlings. Both trunks are doing well...I think I lost about 8 of the 45 seedlings but the rest are doing great.

I hope this helps,
John
 
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Just some more info...

I collected mine on the Withlacoochie River during a river camping (and beer drinking) trip back in 2000. It was the size of a pencil then, and I almost lost it once when my watering system broke down some 8 or 9 years ago. It looks great now as I have been keeping it trimmed into the informal upright style.

I will try to send you a pic if I can get around to finishing my last round of pots. Deadlines, deadlines...:rolleyes:
 

RyanFrye

Chumono
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Just some more info...

I collected mine on the Withlacoochie River during a river camping (and beer drinking) trip back in 2000. It was the size of a pencil then, and I almost lost it once when my watering system broke down some 8 or 9 years ago. It looks great now as I have been keeping it trimmed into the informal upright style.

I will try to send you a pic if I can get around to finishing my last round of pots. Deadlines, deadlines...:rolleyes:
A Pic would be great.
 

RyanFrye

Chumono
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Florida
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I am sure Early spring is probably the best time but with a little care success is even possible in the mid summer. Seedlings can be easily collected and even sometimes just pulled right out of the ground...due to the very hard nature of the mature wood (one of the common names is ironwood) I would strongly suggest a saw for cutting the roots on bigger material as opposed to a shovel.

John
Wow! These are some tough trees! Thanks sharing these tips. It really gives me an insight into what can be done with them. Thank you.
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
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Fairfax Va.
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Shovels are useless

for the most part in collecting trees in the S.E. and Middle Atlantic. Usually takes a brush saw, hand pruners, and a big pry bar with one flat end to collect just about anything 'round here.
 

RyanFrye

Chumono
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Well I ordered my first trident from brent last week. It should arrive some time this week. I still need to give Rob a call about that hornbeam though.....:D
Thanks for the help everyone!
 

mapleman77

Mame
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Near Baton Rouge, Louisiana
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I asked Brent to put me on the waiting list for his rough bark trident. He did but said that I prob. wouldn't get it until fall of next year! Talk about a waiting list...

David
 

RyanFrye

Chumono
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Florida
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I asked Brent to put me on the waiting list for his rough bark trident. He did but said that I prob. wouldn't get it until fall of next year! Talk about a waiting list...

David
LOL I did the same thing and got the same response! At least were in the same boat.:D
 
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