And another one

Firstflush

Yamadori
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coastal sage scrub and chaparral
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10B
Throw some drawers on that girl please!
I have noticed these willow leafs are your thing.
From your grower, you think they are monster air layers with the nebari developed or very old from seed.
 

amcoffeegirl

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Des Moines, IA
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From your grower, you think they are monster air layers with the nebari developed or very old from seed.
There is no from seed with the salicaria ficus.
No one knows where it lives in the wild.
There would be a wasp to pollinate the fig but that wasp is not local to me.
Luckily the grow easily from cuttings or root cuttings.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
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There is no from seed with the salicaria ficus.
No one knows where it lives in the wild.
There would be a wasp to pollinate the fig but that wasp is not local to me.
Luckily the grow easily from cuttings or root cuttings.

Actually, it should produce fruit. But to date, nobody has recorded seeing fruit yet. Its possible somebody did, but didn't know it was an important event. If you are lucky enough to have one fruit, it is critical that you take photos, and then preserve the fruit in grain alcohol, minimum 70% by volume (70% ethanol, booze). Add a couple drops of glycerine to the alcohol before pickling the fruit. Actually about 1 to 2 % glycerine by volume. This will preserve the flexibility of the specimen. Then get copies of the photos & a sample of fruit to Jerry Meislik. There are a couple candidates known from the wild, that we have not been able to narrow down. Fruit is the key botanical trait that separates all Ficus species.

The alcohol-glycerin mix is what botanic herbaria use to preserve specimens where they want to preserve the 3 dimensional structure that is normally lost when a specimen is pressed flat in your "old fashioned" herbarium specimen.
 

amcoffeegirl

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Actually, it should produce fruit. But to date, nobody has recorded seeing fruit yet. Its possible somebody did, but didn't know it was an important event. If you are lucky enough to have one fruit, it is critical that you take photos, and then preserve the fruit in grain alcohol, minimum 70% by volume (70% ethanol, booze). Add a couple drops of glycerine to the alcohol before pickling the fruit. Actually about 1 to 2 % glycerine by volume. This will preserve the flexibility of the specimen. Then get copies of the photos & a sample of fruit to Jerry Meislik. There are a couple candidates known from the wild, that we have not been able to narrow down. Fruit is the key botanical trait that separates all Ficus species.

The alcohol-glycerin mix is what botanic herbaria use to preserve specimens where they want to preserve the 3 dimensional structure that is normally lost when a specimen is pressed flat in your "old fashioned" herbarium specimen.
Thank you.
 
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