Any experience using 'sweating techniques' indoors for i.a. Hawthorns?

Storm87

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Hi all,

Yesterday I collected a Hawthorn (picture will follow).
Anyone has experience with the so called 'sweating technique' (by Tony Tickle) used indoors?

Why I ask? I like to try it, however there will be only rain en clouds the coming weeks and sun is required to my understanding to heat up the air in the plastic bag.
Will it work indoors were it's 20 degrees celsius during the day with the central heating on?

Cheers

Storm
 

Igor. T. Ljubek

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I did it with 3 hawthorns and 2 pretty old oaks (quercus robur) in march 2019. I kept them in my room for about 2 -3 weeks, with average daily temperature of 20-22 degrees celsius. I kept them as close to my central heating as possible. I guess it was 25 - 30 degrees C inside plastic bags during the day. Trees grew like crazy. Then i did a stupid mistake by removing bags and bringing trees outside too soon: one hawthorn and one oak died: the new foliage just dried out during one night! Not sure why other two hawthorns and another oak somehow survived the night but they were in a very bad condition. I saved them by placing a clear (transparent) bags over my trees and mist spray daily. You really need to use a transparent plastic bag after you take your tree from the black one to mitigate the shock. Keep them in moisty transparent bag for about a weak or two (in your room or outside if it's not too cold), then make some holes on transparent bag (you can use a pencil) for another weak, before your trees are finally ready to be moved outside.
 

Storm87

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I did it with 3 hawthorns and 2 pretty old oaks (quercus robur) in march 2019. I kept them in my room for about 2 -3 weeks, with average daily temperature of 20-22 degrees celsius. I kept them as close to my central heating as possible. I guess it was 25 - 30 degrees C inside plastic bags during the day. Trees grew like crazy. Then i did a stupid mistake by removing bags and bringing trees outside too soon: one hawthorn and one oak died: the new foliage just dried out during one night! Not sure why other two hawthorns and another oak somehow survived the night but they were in a very bad condition. I saved them by placing a clear (transparent) bags over my trees and mist spray daily. You really need to use a transparent plastic bag after you take your tree from the black one to mitigate the shock. Keep them in moisty transparent bag for about a weak or two (in your room or outside if it's not too cold), then make some holes on transparent bag (you can use a pencil) for another weak, before your trees are finally ready to be moved outside.
Thx for sharing. I'll keep it in mind!
 

Storm87

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Harry Harrington talks about it often, look him up!
Don't mind me asking. Talks about it where? :)
Before this posted the question I did some reachers, however I could find little on the subject. Maybe my search terms are wrong?
 

BobbyLane

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Don't mind me asking. Talks about it where? :)
Before this posted the question I did some reachers, however I could find little on the subject. Maybe my search terms are wrong?
on facebook, Instagram, his website
 

Storm87

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Never sweated any collected tree.
I do all the sweating.
The hawthorns I collect go right into a colander and into full sun all in the same day.
Sweating was done during collection, anyway I think it was sweat, cus it was pouring that day!..pff ^^
 

Igor. T. Ljubek

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Have you read the comments bellow Tony's thread? You can find many interesting questions and answers there ...

Btw, there is another way how to use black plastic bags: a technique used by Mauro Stemberger and Italian bonsai collectors. It's not a sweating technique. He collects trees (mostly a huge oaks - quercus robur) in December and then he packs them in big plastic bags and store them in unheated green house or a garage during winter. No heat, no humidity, neither mist spray is needed. I found this technique easier (less complicated) and more suitable for my taste. I've been doing some experiments with it this winter: so far so good. Here is the link:

Watch from 5:50 on if you are only interested about this technique.
 
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PieterVE

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I don't use any of those 😅
Unfortunately Bosai4me issn't really comprehensive on the subject. It's mentioned once or twice.

Check his channel on Youtube, he explanes from collecting to aftercare...
 

Storm87

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We are one week past collection. Kept the tree in the plastic bag indoors. I keep a thermometer inside the bag, My guess is that the average temperature is 19-20 degrees celsius during the day. First small buds are becoming visible. However some mold is also forming on the bark.
 

Storm87

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A small photo update on the tree.
Are those aerial roots or buds?
 

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Hartinez

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I’ve sweat 4 different trees now. 2 collected and 2 nursery trees that were in bad shape. 2 of them last year which both thrived after around 3 weeks in the bags. This year the 2 in bags are a collected oak and a nursery Euonymous that was in bad shape. Both have begun pushing buds all over in the last few days. Both examples of collected trees were due to the timing of collection, being earlier than they should have been dug. The nursery trees were both on the brink after poor care at their nursery. I’m a believer in the process. However all of mine were put oylutside in the sun during the day and brought in at night. I’ve begun leaving them outside this year but still bagged. I’ll let the buds and shoots extend a bit longer before removing the bag.
 

Storm87

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Until now I kept the trees indoors, because the last couple of weeks we had so much wind and rain and no sun at all. The forecasts are much better the coming weeks so i'll move them outside form this weekend.
 

Storm87

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My only concern is that mold keeps forming on the bark. I let the tree ventilate everyday, but that does not seems to get rid of the mold.
Will a few day's in full sun do the trick (in the bag ofc)? Any suggestions?
 

Hartinez

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Not sure about the mold. I do know my climate is probably considerably less humid. Though I suppose the bag is very humid regardless. I do also poke several holes in the bags towards the top, partly for ventilation and partly to mist the bag. Here’s a few pics of what I do. I also use basic tomato cages to keep the bag propped up like a tent and a basic clamp to cinch the bag at the top. I check and open the bag all the way daily. I’ll get a pic tomorrow of the buds popping. At this point the bags stay out all day and night, but for the first several nights i was bringing in at night and only leaving outside if it was warm and sunny. Which here in NM is most days. 😂
 

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