Any help with this Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) yamadori?

drawnbyjared

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Hi all, I'm really new to all of this and this will only be my second time digging up a tree, and I'm not finding a whole lot of info about Rose of Sharon or hibiscus bonsai here, so I thought I'd ask!
Someone in my city posted this tree up for free for anyone willing to come dig it up, and I certainly couldn't pass it up! It's pretty huge, and my main concern at the moment is what I'm going to bury it in. From what I've seen, pure pumice is the best thing to plant yamadori in to recover, but there isn't anywhere locally that sells it and I don't have much on hand. Currently, I've got 2 gallons of a pumice/lava rock mix, 2.5-3 gallons of NAPA 8822 (Diatomaceous Earth), cocoa bean shells, and some pine bark mulch, so I'm pretty much limited to that plus things you can find at a typical Lowes/HD like perlite, potting soil, etc. These are the only pics I have to go off, so I don't know exactly how big it is or what size container I'm going to need to fill, so I just want to be sure I've got enough soil for it.

They've already cut the branches for transport (as you can see in the last pic) but I'll probably cut it further. Any tips or info you might have on the species or collection are appreciated!

I'm going to dig it up tomorrow after work, so unfortunately I'm on a ticking clock with getting things together!
 

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Shibui

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Hibiscus have been among the easier species to transplant down here so I see little cause for concern with this transplant.
They can recover from total bare root and huge root reduction so don't be afraid to reduce roots to fit a container even if that means you are only left with stumps. New roots will emerge from the cut ends pretty quick if my experience is anything to go on.
Same with above ground. You should expect new buds all over the upper ends of branches, even down to the main trunk if the branches are cut back enough.

All my collected trees and transplants go into the same mix I use for bonsai. Seems sensible to me to plant into the mix they will have to get used to for the erst of their lives and the mix is also designed to be the best for potted trees. There is a fair bit of leeway in what trees will cope with so just do your best with what you have to mix up a decent looking well drained concoction to hold it up and allow new roots to grow.
 

drawnbyjared

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Hibiscus have been among the easier species to transplant down here so I see little cause for concern with this transplant.
They can recover from total bare root and huge root reduction so don't be afraid to reduce roots to fit a container even if that means you are only left with stumps. New roots will emerge from the cut ends pretty quick if my experience is anything to go on.
Same with above ground. You should expect new buds all over the upper ends of branches, even down to the main trunk if the branches are cut back enough.

All my collected trees and transplants go into the same mix I use for bonsai. Seems sensible to me to plant into the mix they will have to get used to for the erst of their lives and the mix is also designed to be the best for potted trees. There is a fair bit of leeway in what trees will cope with so just do your best with what you have to mix up a decent looking well drained concoction to hold it up and allow new roots to grow.
Thanks, gives me some confidence in its survival! Looking forward to digging it up today :)
 

Colorado

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I would just use the pumice/lava mix, maybe throw in some of the DE. Cool tree!
 

sorce

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Best grab them pallets to make a box too I reckon.

Welcome to Crazy Frugal!

Sorce
 

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