Any idea what this could be?

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#1
This is my friends crabapple tree and leaves are red and scorched. 20180803_070638.jpg 20180803_070638.jpg 20180803_070647.jpg
Any idea of what this could be?
 
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Richmond, VA
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#4
Whatever it is, bag up or burn any fallen leaves; the affected leaves may fall off and those should be disposed of also. Treat with a fungicide, try to eliminate any overhead watering going on, and try to ensure good airflow around the plant.
 
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NE Ohio: zone 5b (USA)
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#5
Whatever it is, bag up or burn any fallen leaves; the affected leaves may fall off and those should be disposed of also. Treat with a fungicide, try to eliminate any overhead watering going on, and try to ensure good airflow around the plant.
Forgot about that curse of a fungus...Apple cedar rust. Apple spot is just so common here in my neck of the woods. Pray it's not that.
 
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#7
Forgot about that curse of a fungus...Apple cedar rust. Apple spot is just so common here in my neck of the woods. Pray it's not that.
Not positive, but I think cedar apple rust may start as yellow or orange spots, and then change to a rust color. But that's not enough for me to say it is or isn't cedar apple rust. Hopefully it's just some minor leaf spot.
 
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#8
you think this tree will benefit from defoliation?
I'll wait for some apple experts to reply because I've never grown apples as bonsai.

But I would find out from your friend about this tree's growth this growing season before defoliating. How much, if any work done this season, repotting, the vigor of the tree, and it's age; these are all questions that need answers before attempting to defoliate?

Other than the spotting it looks rather healthy, I'm sure you guys have enough growing season left to get another flush of growth.

On a side note, I've noticed on my prunus that late season growth never makes it to the following spring. The young stems that were grown in the fall usually die back, the older stems that we're pushed in spring and early summer always push out the following spring. Don't know if that could be the case for apples too, but something to think about.
 
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#10
Was told crabapple rust.
Maybe, maybe not. I would think the fruit would be affected too, and I'm not really seeing anything on them. Unless this is a relatively new infection, the other symptoms are yet to be shown. But I think cedar apple rust is more of an early spring to early summer thing.

I'm sure like you in NJ, we've had a pretty wet and humid spring and summer in VA, especially the last month... Hopefully this is just a less severe fungal infection from our wet weather.
 
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#11
Are you seeing other symptoms going on?
Quote came from below source.
http://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-and-plant-advice/help-diseases/cedar-apple-rust

Symptoms on Apple and Crabapple
On leaves: Bright yellow/orange spots develop on the upper surface of the leaves in late spring. These spots gradually enlarge, becoming evident on the undersurface of the leaves as small bulges. In midsummer, these rust lesions develop hairlike, cylindrical tubes (hyphae), which release spores into the air that are blown to the juniper host. Infected leaves of apples and crabapples may drop, with defoliation more severe in dry summers. Galls that form on the juniper host do not become evident until July the next year, requiring two years for the fungus to complete its life cycle.

On twigs: The rust appears as a swollen corky gall on the current year’s growth, usually no more than 1 inch in length. The swelling eventually develops the characteristic cylindrical fruiting bodies. Seriously affected twigs are stunted and may die.

On fruit: The rust causes yellow to orange spots similar to those found on the leaves, but the spots are usually much larger. Fruit infection causes an inferior fruit quality or premature fruit drop.

Symptoms on Juniper
 

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