Anyone ever used kiryu?

Graydon

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I was at Bonsaimonk last week and they had just received a container from Japan. I was hoping to pick up some pots I had ordered and when I was poking around I found a pallet of a soil/component I had not seen. It's kiryu and appears to be a volcanic product similar to akadama or pumice. Karen ordered it as a test and I got the first few bags. It appears to be a mix of sorts. I'll shoot a few photos when I have some daylight time free.

Anyone have any input?
 

Tachigi

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Graydon it is pumice. We got some samples last year from them. I'm sure in the right climate it has its value but here in the mid atlantic it didn't do much except lighten the pot. Which I guess is a plus if your hernia prone
 

Graydon

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Thanks for the info Tom. I did not open a bag but the weight was similar to the pumice I use in my mix now. Same price and bag size but not such a glaring white color. I'll give it a try this potting session and see how it does.
 

rlist

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Thanks for the info Tom. I did not open a bag but the weight was similar to the pumice I use in my mix now. Same price and bag size but not such a glaring white color. I'll give it a try this potting session and see how it does.

Can I ask how much a bag of imported pumice goes for down south???
 

tom tynan

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I believe "Kiryu" is considered a river sand and comes from the Kiryu region in Japan. I do not think it is classified as a volcanic product aka. pumice. I have ordered it before from Dallas Bonsai Gardens for approx. $18 for 5 quarts. It is definitely not a light product in weight. It is a heavy coarse river sand with sharp edges. It is another excellent product - but clearly expensive and in the quantities needed - shipping becomes very costly.

Hey Rich L. - no one can compete with you Oregon guys when it comes to availabilty and price on pumice. It is very hard to find on the East Coast of the United States. I advise looking at feed stores that deal with horses and look for a horse bedding product called "Dry Stall" - it comes from California and costs approx. $15 for a 50lb. bag. it must be sifted heavily to remove the dust. It works great with Pines and Junipers. The Turface line of products is still probably our best bet on the East Coast -simply because of the game of golf - this is the product used to keep those greens and fairways open year round. At $11 to $15 for a 50lb. bag - you can't go wrong....Oh...the endless tales about soil products....Tom
 

rlist

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Hey Rich L. - no one can compete with you Oregon guys when it comes to availabilty and price on pumice. It is very hard to find on the East Coast of the United States. I advise looking at feed stores that deal with horses and look for a horse bedding product called "Dry Stall" - it comes from California and costs approx. $15 for a 50lb. bag. it must be sifted heavily to remove the dust. It works great with Pines and Junipers. The Turface line of products is still probably our best bet on the East Coast -simply because of the game of golf - this is the product used to keep those greens and fairways open year round. At $11 to $15 for a 50lb. bag - you can't go wrong....Oh...the endless tales about soil products....Tom

Well then, maybe I should start selling sifted pumice online... :)

Rich

p.s. Hey Tom! Hope all is well!
 

Graydon

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Can I ask how much a bag of imported pumice goes for down south???

Rich - Honestly I have no idea. I vend to Bonsaimonk wholesale and they reciprocate by selling me any of their products at wholesale. I will not receive the bill for a few weeks. I believe she said it will sell retail for the same as the other pumice which is $25 for 16 liters. It's the freight that gets expensive down south or east coast. That's why I try to pick up things like soil components myself while traveling in the car.

Tom - I have purchased the river sand you describe from Dallas Bonsai before and this is not the same stuff. I was hoping it was as I really likes the coarseness and lack of absorption of that sand in my mix but this is a partial volcanic product that will crush if you apply pressure.

Actually there are three distinct particles in this mix. The darkest and the lightest color are a sand that will not crush under finger pressure. The mid color particle will crush and seems a bit like akadama but harder. I would compare it to a product Dallas Bonsai sells (or did sell) that was a mix of akadama and sands. I just checked their site and could not find it but found it described in this newsletter. I purchased some a year ago and really loved it except for the price. I think this may be the same type mix. Now that I have opened it and fiddles around with it I think I'm gonna need some more.

Attached are photos of the bag of the other pumice I use, the bag of the new stuff in question and a close up of the new stuff wet and dry.
 

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