Appropriate pot size for boxwood

Messages
698
Likes
747
Location
Alameda, CA
USDA Zone
10a
#2
Would it be safe to pot this boxwood into this pot? I just got the tree, and it’s roots are splitting the pot. I have a larger pot, but I’d like to use this beauty. Pot was made by @hometeamrocker
I think it's impossible to say until you have a look at the roots. The good thing is that you have a second pot available in case you can't reduce the roots enough.
 

0soyoung

Masterpiece
Messages
3,873
Likes
5,333
Location
Anacortes, WA
USDA Zone
8b
#3
Would it be safe to pot this boxwood into this pot? I just got the tree, and it’s roots are splitting the pot. I have a larger pot, but I’d like to use this beauty. Pot was made by @hometeamrocker
From the pot on the right, into the one on the left? If so, sure --> yes.
The move is mostly thinning the root pad; a little radial trim (to have room to grow).
 

defra

Masterpiece
Messages
2,190
Likes
3,745
Location
The netherlands Zone 8b
USDA Zone
8b
#4
I too think you will get it in ive root pruned healthy boxwoods from nursery cans to to training pots in one go without troubles so far
But keep another pot availible just in case
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
19,059
Likes
24,113
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
#5
Have a look at this post.

https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/boxwood-for-real.29340/post-538523

A fast link to the most drastic reduction...
This one is MOST healthy!
https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/bloody-box.28409/post-477654

Forgive me, but first a brainstorm on the OPPOSITE of what you are looking to do, for insight.

Please note that in the following, "removal", means drastic initial cut back removal. Which is exactly what you need to be concerned with, in your attempt to safely pot this box.

I ended up finding one more of the Bloody box that was reduced on the top, with the bottom untouched.
It has faired well and has given a bit more insight to this theory....

There is a very very calculatable amount of foliage that can be removed (with the bottom left untouched) for the tree to survive.

Further, the amount of foliage you can safely remove without equally reducing the bottom has a lot to do with amount of roots/soil the tree has.

Basically, the more soil/roots, the more you can safely remove from ONLY the top.

For instance...
A one Gallon nursery shrub can have a small amount of top removed and recover.

A 5 gl nursery shrub can have a greater amount of foliage removed.

So on until....

A tree in the ground, which in theory, should be able to be cut back to nothing and still grow.

_______

So to properly address your concern in an appropriate Bonsai fashion.....

We need to see better pics of the tree to understand how much foliage you need to remove to set this thing on its appropriate bonsai path RIGHT NOW!

Because there is such a direct relation to balanced top and bottom removal for health...
And because when the fastest route to take is also the safest....

We First must know how much the tree will be reduced when taken back to Proper nexts. Ie, no tridents, no reverse taper, all shitty branches removed, what's left on for sacrifice. .. Etc....EVERYTHING.

Basically....give it any and all hell you need to in order to give it its perfect start to Bonsai life.....

And if when an equal amount of roots are removed, it fits in that pot....

Then yes....put it in it!

From here in Dav4's chair, it seems an appropriate initial reduction of top WILL allow for root removal to fit in this HTR pot.

____

So here's the best part that makes Boxwood so Awesome.......

The effects of unequal top and bottom work do not show up until after winter.
Dunno why, doesn't matter.....

YOU CAN...

Do all your initial heavy to proper nexts reductions NOW...in Spring...

Leave it to regrow and rest a couple days into summer dormancy...

Gauge where your new "balance" is...

And repot with appropriate amount of root removal before fall growth begins.

Please note that this works here, and because Boxwood is so Damn compliant, the only difference as you move south is larger windows of opportunity. ...

Uh....IMO!

Sorce
 
Messages
227
Likes
179
Location
Atlanta, GA
USDA Zone
7b
#6
Have a look at this post.

https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/boxwood-for-real.29340/post-538523

A fast link to the most drastic reduction...
This one is MOST healthy!
https://www.bonsainut.com/threads/bloody-box.28409/post-477654

Forgive me, but first a brainstorm on the OPPOSITE of what you are looking to do, for insight.

Please note that in the following, "removal", means drastic initial cut back removal. Which is exactly what you need to be concerned with, in your attempt to safely pot this box.

I ended up finding one more of the Bloody box that was reduced on the top, with the bottom untouched.
It has faired well and has given a bit more insight to this theory....

There is a very very calculatable amount of foliage that can be removed (with the bottom left untouched) for the tree to survive.

Further, the amount of foliage you can safely remove without equally reducing the bottom has a lot to do with amount of roots/soil the tree has.

Basically, the more soil/roots, the more you can safely remove from ONLY the top.

For instance...
A one Gallon nursery shrub can have a small amount of top removed and recover.

A 5 gl nursery shrub can have a greater amount of foliage removed.

So on until....

A tree in the ground, which in theory, should be able to be cut back to nothing and still grow.

_______

So to properly address your concern in an appropriate Bonsai fashion.....

We need to see better pics of the tree to understand how much foliage you need to remove to set this thing on its appropriate bonsai path RIGHT NOW!

Because there is such a direct relation to balanced top and bottom removal for health...
And because when the fastest route to take is also the safest....

We First must know how much the tree will be reduced when taken back to Proper nexts. Ie, no tridents, no reverse taper, all shitty branches removed, what's left on for sacrifice. .. Etc....EVERYTHING.

Basically....give it any and all hell you need to in order to give it its perfect start to Bonsai life.....

And if when an equal amount of roots are removed, it fits in that pot....

Then yes....put it in it!

From here in Dav4's chair, it seems an appropriate initial reduction of top WILL allow for root removal to fit in this HTR pot.

____

So here's the best part that makes Boxwood so Awesome.......

The effects of unequal top and bottom work do not show up until after winter.
Dunno why, doesn't matter.....

YOU CAN...

Do all your initial heavy to proper nexts reductions NOW...in Spring...

Leave it to regrow and rest a couple days into summer dormancy...

Gauge where your new "balance" is...

And repot with appropriate amount of root removal before fall growth begins.

Please note that this works here, and because Boxwood is so Damn compliant, the only difference as you move south is larger windows of opportunity. ...

Uh....IMO!

Sorce
Thanks for the reply. I got it from plant city bonsai, and I like the branching and on it, so I wasn’t planning on cutting it back, just styling it.

I bought two of these trees, but only had time to pot one of them. The roots were very dense, and I raked out and trimmed significantly. I did get to a point where I needed to make the root mass more shallow, but my chopstick couldn’t penetrate it, and my big scissors couldn’t cut it (probably 4” deep) Is that a time for root cutters, or is that a time to stop what I’m doing and put it in a pot?
 

Attachments

Messages
133
Likes
101
Location
Just south of Atlanta
USDA Zone
8a
#7
I have a couple very similar to what you have. I bought them from Plant City too. I am going to do a light trimming on top and reduce the roots by 30-40%. The pot I put it in won't be nearly shallow enough based on the size of the tree but it will keep me in safe zone. Later in the year, once the roots recover I am going to work on the top some more and next spring the roots will be reduced again. I have chopped the heck out of the roots of some deciduous material this spring and so far none have died. I just didn't want to be as aggressive with these.
 
Messages
181
Likes
218
Location
Toledo Ohio
USDA Zone
6a
#8
I freakin' love these boxwood threads! I've got to read them three times because the information is so good, and because my eyes are drooling from all the great pictures.

Any tips/tricks for BoxWood branch movement work? I've seen info both for and against wiring, and for and against using guy wires. I've done some preliminary searches here, but am looking for more.

I'm cool with you posting links in the reply. I don't mind digging into previous discussions, I just haven't found them on my own. I'm particaularly interested in when'where to consider using each type of technique. I need to learn more general info on the art of guy-wiring anyway.
 
Last edited:
Messages
227
Likes
179
Location
Atlanta, GA
USDA Zone
7b
#9
I freakin' love these boxwood threads! I've got to read them three times because the information is so good, and because my eyes are drooling from all the great pictures.

Any tips/tricks for BoxWood branch movement work? I've seen info both for and against wiring, and for and against using guy wires. I've done some preliminary searches here, but am looking for more.

I'm cool with you posting links in the reply. I don't mind digging into previous discussions, I just haven't found them on my own. I'm particaularly interested in when'where to consider using each type of technique. I need to learn more general info on the art of guy-wiring anyway.
Don't ask me, i haven't gotten that far and have no idea!
 

Vin

Masterpiece
Messages
4,908
Likes
6,638
Location
Panama City, FL Zone 9a/8b Centr
USDA Zone
8b
#10
Just throwing this out there. If you Google Boxwood Bonsai you find most of them are in deeper pots like Azaleas are. I have been using deeper pots for several years now and haven't had any issues like I did when everyone was telling me to put them in shallow pots. Kingsville seems to be at least one exception. Just some additional insight for what it's worth.