Austrian Black Pine

JasonG

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Here is a little black pine I got from a friend.
Picture was taken March, 2008

And today, March, 2009
Full progression and other photos on my blog


Thanks, Jason
 

Dav4

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Nice little tree and, honestly, the best Austrian pine I've seen from the states. Any idea how old/how long in training for this tree?

Dave
 

pjkatich

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Jason,

You did a very nice job with this tree. Thanks for sharing.

Cheers,
Paul
 

RyanFrye

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This a great tree. I'm not sure if it is the photo...but do I detect reverse taper?
 

mapleman77

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It looks like a MAJOR trunk chop that resulted in a large scar...but it doesn't look bad at all! I really like this tree too--but the needles look a little yellower on the 09 photo. I'm sure it's nothing, but just making sure...

David
 

JasonG

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Nice little tree and, honestly, the best Austrian pine I've seen from the states. Any idea how old/how long in training for this tree?

Dave

Hi Dave,
For some reason here in America the Austrian pine is rarely used as bonsai. But they are everywhere in the landscape industry. This tree belonged to Ryan Neil (Mr. Kimura's apprentice) and if memory serves me correctly it worked on in a Marco workshop before Ryan went to Japan over 5 years ago. So for the past several years it was been neglected.


Jason,

You did a very nice job with this tree. Thanks for sharing.

Cheers,
Paul

Thanks Paul

This a great tree. I'm not sure if it is the photo...but do I detect reverse taper?

It looks like a MAJOR trunk chop that resulted in a large scar...but it doesn't look bad at all! I really like this tree too--but the needles look a little yellower on the 09 photo. I'm sure it's nothing, but just making sure...

David

Hi Ryan and Dave,

Yeah, there is slight reverse taper there depending on which angle you see it at. It can be fixed so I am not too worried about it and it isn't that bad. But it is due to the scar. These pics were taken with different cameras and with different lighting so that explains most of the color difference however, the earlier pic was in the middle of a growing season while the later pic is just coming out of dormancy. With a blast or 2 or Miracle grow over the next few weeks the color will green up a bit more.

Thanks, Jason
 

rlist

Shohin
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Nice tree - when it gets refined again it will be bad arse.

Nicer wiring in job. Where's Chris to discuss the fine points of wiring a tree into a pot when we need him!
 

emorrin

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I am going to grow some Pinus Nigra from seed this year (before I get too old). I know you did not get this tree at an early age but maybe you can answer a question.

Do you treat the Pinus Nigra species exactly like a JBP? I am going to be growing from seed using the method in the Stone Lantern "Pines" book. I am assuming that what is true for a JBP will be true for a Pinus Nigra. I am also going to grow a few in the ground.

You are right, I do not see many Austrian Pine bonsai out there. They are all over the place where I live as landscape trees. I decided to give it a shot since I have several full grown Austrian Pines adjacent to my back yard so I easily collect seeds. I have seen that in the weaker areas of said trees that the needles do reduce nicely so I am hoping to get some nice Shohin sized bonsai 10 to 15 years from now.
 

treebeard55

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I too live where Austrian pine is all over the place. Go into any general-purpose nursery and it's one of the three pines they all offer. (The other two are eastern white, P. strobus, and mugo.)

I've been looking for a pine species that is inexpensive, easy to find, and that I can recommend to newbies. I've started playing with Austrians to see how well they fit my bill. I'll follow with interest any threads about them.

To see what an Austrian pine bonsai can look like, go to Walter Pall's website. I don't know if any of my trees will ever look like some of his, but I'll make better bonsai for trying. :)
 

emorrin

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The difference is that Walter Pall's trees are collected and what we are looking at are seedlings or nursery material. The collected trees are usually 100+ years old versus a couple year old seedling from a nursery or actually growing from seeds like I am trying. I see what I am attempting is a 15 to 20 year project. I started growing from seeds 2 months ago and have about 60 Austrian Pines and 70 Scotch Pines at the moment. I have been culling the weak ones and I am sure I will lose some along the journey. I am basically growing from seed using the "Pine from Seed" article in the Stone Lantern Pines book.

I have heard that they react like Japanese Black Pines but you need to be a little more careful in pruning, etc. I too will be following any threads about them and will provide updates on how my little "experiment" is going.
 

treebeard55

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The difference is that Walter Pall's trees are collected and what we are looking at are seedlings or nursery material. The collected trees are usually 100+ years old versus a couple year old seedling from a nursery or actually growing from seeds like I am trying. ...

I couldn't agree more. A collected tree that has successfully resisted heat, storms, bugs, you-name-it, will have character that a nursery-grown tree can't match. But we can try to reproduce the image of that character in our other trees. Again, even if we don't succeed completely, our trees will be better for the effort.

Sounds like you're doing what I'd do if I had the ground space right now. Best of luck! I'm also planning to apply the same techniques one would use for JBP in the few Austrians I can work with, and see how the trees respond.
 

Maloghurst

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The difference is that Walter Pall's trees are collected and what we are looking at are seedlings or nursery material. The collected trees are usually 100+ years old versus a couple year old seedling from a nursery or actually growing from seeds like I am trying. I see what I am attempting is a 15 to 20 year project. I started growing from seeds 2 months ago and have about 60 Austrian Pines and 70 Scotch Pines at the moment. I have been culling the weak ones and I am sure I will lose some along the journey. I am basically growing from seed using the "Pine from Seed" article in the Stone Lantern Pines book.

I have heard that they react like Japanese Black Pines but you need to be a little more careful in pruning, etc. I too will be following any threads about them and will provide updates on how my little "experiment" is going.
Hey there could you update on the pines from seeds? Maybe some pics? Thank you, Mike
 

Adair M

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Unfortunately,

These old posts are completely wrong! Austrian Black pines do NOT respond like JBP! They do not send out a second flush of candles.

Treat them like JWP. Single flush pines.
 

f1pt4

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Hey there could you update on the pines from seeds? Maybe some pics? Thank you, Mike

OP was last seen online 2015. So I doubt we'll get an update. Unless the pine was sold, to an active member here. Way to dig up old threads. Never seen this before.
 

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