Azalea issue

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#1



I've had this Azalea for about 5 years now. It's always been healthy and blooms very nice every spring. I've been noticing though these past 2-3 weeks that there is about 2 branches on the lower right where the leaves turned brownish and dropped. The branches themselves are still very much alive (flexable and bright green when scratched) but I'm not sure why it's doing this? I'm trying to remember when it had its last repot and I'm thinking that was probably close to 3 years ago. Could it be a root issue and maybe needs to be repotted?
 
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#3
Yeah I'm a bit baffled. When I saw it doing this I expected the branches to be stiff and brittle, but they aren't. I dunno what is going on but hope someone does so I can nip it in the bud before it gets worse.
 

just.wing.it

Imperial Masterpiece
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Blips and Chitz (mid MD, 6b...ish)
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#4
Yeah I'm a bit baffled. When I saw it doing this I expected the branches to be stiff and brittle, but they aren't. I dunno what is going on but hope someone does so I can nip it in the bud before it gets worse.
My gut says fungal...but I have no basis for that assumption...
 
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#5
I'm thinking that as well. Either fingus or root root starting or something . I'm thinking I may repot it this weekend and see what is going on. I'm pretty sure it was late 2014 or early 2015 when it was last potted so it's due if nothing else. Plus that way I can see if maybe something is going on with the roots too.
 
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Milwaukee WI
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#7
My opinion, for what it’s worth, is to begin by cutting the wires and gently lifting it out for a look. In my experience, problems specific to a few but not all branches are frequently root-related. No matter what soil it’s in now, after three years the soil is bound to have broken down some and perhaps compacted to the point where part of the root mass is not draining.
Particularly with azaleas, I think there’s very little downside to repotting now as long as one is judicious about how much the roots get molested. Certainly less risk than waiting for the problem to progress. If it were mine, I would go into straight medium-grain kanuma, but people have different feelings on that topic. Best of luck with it.
 
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Mobile, Alabama-The Heart of Dixie
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#8
If the branches are still green, it is most likely Rhizoctonia Web Blight. I get it on some of mine this time of the year. If the limbs or trunk are not green, it is probably this Phytophthora Root Rot & Top Dieback. Death sentence. I lost three of my better azaleas this Spring to it. The last two years have been brutal, all sorts of fungal issues, despite repeated fungicide treatments. This site is pretty good for identification/ treatment: http://weedsinlawn.com/Blog/portfolio/azalea-rhododendron-shrub-diseases/ .
 
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#9
Appreciate the help guys. I had never heard of Rhizoctonia Web Blight but reading about that right now. I'm going to tryin get it out of the pot today and take a loot at it so I'll post back what the roots look like.
 
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#10
Just got done repotting it. The good news is I don't think there was any root rot. While I have never experienced root rot before and don't know for sure what it looks like in person, I always heard that not only would there be fungus on the roots but you could smell it. I didn't see any sort of fungus on my roots and it didn't smell at all so I think I'm okay far as rot goes. I think it may have simply been just way overdue for a repot is all I hope. Because once I got it out of the pot the root mass was so compacted that there was no way it could have been draining off much water what so ever. It took me awhile even to get my root pick pushed through the mass it was so dense.

I didn't want to do too much root work to it but I had to get as much of the old soil lose from it as I could. Got a lot of the old soil off and made a bunch of holes through the remaining root mass with my pick to try to get some air into it and then repotted into a much more free draining soil that still has a bit of organic mixed in. We'll see how it does for the rest of the fall now.



 
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San Francisco
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#11
Ne NE This is why I say is soils. hai SOme say root problem, but soils problem, no water to root. Hai
 
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near Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
#13
It would be interesting if we could see some pictures of individual leaves. It would be important to have all, that is, the good, the bad and the ugly. I know it's asking a lot but both sides of the same leaf can often tell a different story.
 
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San Francisco
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#14
It would be interesting if we could see some pictures of individual leaves. It would be important to have all, that is, the good, the bad and the ugly. I know it's asking a lot but both sides of the same leaf can often tell a different story.
One day I say to Sensei hey, some part show stress, not same problems potentially. He take his shoe off from foot and hit my head say leaving now! Hai One tree is one story, you not pay attention? I sorry for him long time. Hai Hai
 
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#15
It would be interesting if we could see some pictures of individual leaves. It would be important to have all, that is, the good, the bad and the ugly. I know it's asking a lot but both sides of the same leaf can often tell a different story.
No problem here ya go....



 
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Milwaukee WI
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#16
If the branches are still green, it is most likely Rhizoctonia Web Blight. I get it on some of mine this time of the year. If the limbs or trunk are not green, it is probably this Phytophthora Root Rot & Top Dieback. Death sentence. I lost three of my better azaleas this Spring to it. The last two years have been brutal, all sorts of fungal issues, despite repeated fungicide treatments. This site is pretty good for identification/ treatment: http://weedsinlawn.com/Blog/portfolio/azalea-rhododendron-shrub-diseases/ .
Thank you so much for that link, lots of useful info.
 
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Location
near Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
#17
Do I see some insect frass under and near your right index finger in the second photo? It's certainly within the realm of possibility you have multiple issues on these plants. We all know how quickly the problems can multiply on a stressed plant.
Here in the Pacific NW, our several years of drought have stressed our trees and shrubs beyond anything anyone has ever seen. Our own landscape azaleas and rhodys are suffering terribly from lacewing. Last night on the local news, a tree pathologist from the university was discussing a 10 year, progressive, die back of Big Leaf maples in our forests. And this is a key species in this ecosystem.
 
Messages
13
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Location
near Seattle, WA
USDA Zone
8a
#18
One day I say to Sensei hey, some part show stress, not same problems potentially. He take his shoe off from foot and hit my head say leaving now! Hai One tree is one story, you not pay attention? I sorry for him long time. Hai Hai
Very important, the point you make, Grasshopper.
 
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SE Michigan
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#19
Do I see some insect frass under and near your right index finger in the second photo? It's certainly within the realm of possibility you have multiple issues on these plants. We all know how quickly the problems can multiply on a stressed plant.
Here in the Pacific NW, our several years of drought have stressed our trees and shrubs beyond anything anyone has ever seen. Our own landscape azaleas and rhodys are suffering terribly from lacewing. Last night on the local news, a tree pathologist from the university was discussing a 10 year, progressive, die back of Big Leaf maples in our forests. And this is a key species in this ecosystem.
Not that I have noticed. To the best of my knowledge I haven't ever seen any sort of insects on the azalea.
 

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