Beginner Questions - Mugo Pine

somegeek

Yamadori
Messages
89
Reaction score
1
Location
SW Washintgon
USDA Zone
8b
I pruned this tree back a bit but I've read that you should leave 1/2" stub or so to die back to be cleaned up flush later, but then I've read to remove it and concave it a bit so it heals over more or less flush. Did I do this wrong?



I need to cut this one back to a single trunk but wanted to see if the above was the right/wrong way to go about it.



Appreciate any input.

somegeek
 

Klytus

Omono
Messages
1,305
Reaction score
22
Location
Singing Pines Tyneside-England
USDA Zone
8a
Yes you errred,there is precious little living material between the points above and below the injury.

Your multitrunk is possibly a multitree already merging below the soil to yield a wide trunk.
 
Last edited:

somegeek

Yamadori
Messages
89
Reaction score
1
Location
SW Washintgon
USDA Zone
8b
Yes you errred,there is precious little living material between the points above and below the injury.

Would the proper method here have been to leave 1/2" stubs to be trimmed back later once they died back?

Your multitrunk is possibly a multitree already merging below the soil to yield a wide trunk.

Ah okay - I'll do some soil removal and see what's down there.

Appreciate the reply. :)

somegeek
 

Klytus

Omono
Messages
1,305
Reaction score
22
Location
Singing Pines Tyneside-England
USDA Zone
8a
I would have tried a more gradual approach,it's like the fear of the trunk bulging should be tempered by considering the loss of vigour.:eek:

It's sometimes difficult to leave a stub.
 

Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
Messages
13,678
Reaction score
15,935
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
You should have left stubs for three reasons. One: With Mugos the removal of a major branch can cause the life line to that branch to die causing the associated root to die and causing that portion of the trunk to die. Leaving a stub allows the tree to readjust those resources without the possible side effects. Two: Cutting flush, especially a large branch, can cause a large scar to form even if you hollow out the injury. Three: In this case it is as been pointed out, there are precious little pathways remaining for the top of the tree. Mugos are notorious for forming knuckles (large bulges with a lot of branches coming out of them) that need to be dealt with carefully.
 

somegeek

Yamadori
Messages
89
Reaction score
1
Location
SW Washintgon
USDA Zone
8b
Ok, noted - thanks for the explanation. :)

Can you flush/concave cut a branch on a mugo if the branch is smaller or is it a general rule of thumb to always leave a stub to come back to later?
 

Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
Messages
13,678
Reaction score
15,935
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
5-6
Ok, noted - thanks for the explanation. :)

Can you flush/concave cut a branch on a mugo if the branch is smaller or is it a general rule of thumb to always leave a stub to come back to later?

It kind of depends on the over-all size of the tree. Normally I would say a branch the size of a pencil or smaller would be fine to flush cut---unless the size of the tree is not very much larger. To think of it in those terms I believe it safe to flush cut if the branch is less that 1/8 the diameter of the trunk.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom