Best way to propagate this?

MattE

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Since I bought this tree alittle over a year ago..in this one grafted section I can see an amazing future bonsai in 5 to 10 years.. I only have one chance to get this to root. I have done alot of reading on propagation and ficus.. some say cut it stick it in dirt it will root it's a ficus. Others say place in water strip alittle bit of cambium away ect. Any tips and tricks would be greatly appreciated.
 

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You can always airlayer it if loosing the cutting is too much of a risk. Perhaps some members with indoor growing experience would know more about what the cutting may appreciate, like a humidity tent etc. I have no experience with that.
 

MattE

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You can always airlayer it if loosing the cutting is too much of a risk. Perhaps some members with indoor growing experience would know more about what the cutting may appreciate, like a humidity tent etc. I have no experience with that.
Thank you , i was thinking of air layer but it does intimidate me lol.
 

Tbwilson33

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Thank you , i was thinking of air layer but it does intimidate me lol.
Don’t let it. I watched probably 7 or 8 different videos and just went for it and it was a great feeling to see it root. My first one was on a tiger bark ficus. I’m not sure if that’s what you have but I know it’s a ficus. Go for it
 

cbroad

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thinking of air layer
I was thinking that too, as long as the plant seems healthy. If you try it, make sure it's getting good light, preferably outside; looks like you might be keeping it indoors.

I've been successful striking ficus cuttings, hydroponically and under lights, using a clear trash bag as a humidity tent. They were probably a little short of 1/2" diameter and around 18" tall. Very very easy to root for me.

This should link to my post from my thread about mine
 
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MattE

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Don’t let it. I watched probably 7 or 8 different videos and just went for it and it was a great feeling to see it root. My first one was on a tiger bark ficus. I’m not sure if that’s what you have but I know it’s a ficus. Go for it
I think the top grafted portion is tiger bark maybe I'll get some moss and try it out lol
 

MattE

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I was thinking that too, as long as the plant seems healthy. If you try it, make sure it's getting good light, preferably outside; looks like you might be keeping it indoors.

I've been successful striking ficus cuttings, hydroponically and under lights, using a clear trash bag as a humidity tent. They were probably a little short of 1/2" diameter and around 18" tall. Very very easy to root for me.

This should link to my post from my thread about mine
Yeah it's in a south facing window get huge light all day it's just getting warm enough for me to put it outside and its growing like crazy. I will have to check out the bag method
 

garywood

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Yeah it's in a south facing window get huge light all day it's just getting warm enough for me to put it outside and its growing like crazy. I will have to check out the bag method
Matt, clear tote's turned upside down with a few holes drilled for a little ventilation make good propagating chambers.
 

MattE

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Matt, clear tote's turned upside down with a few holes drilled for a little ventilation make good propagating chambers.
And you put the cutting in the tote in water? Ir stick the cutting through a hole and use humidity to grow the roots? Sorry I'm co fused by this
 

garywood

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Stick cuttings in pots with whatever you use for bonsai soil. Water and mist the inside of the tote to keep humidity up. The lid is the bottom and the recessed lip is a neat reservoir for added humidity while the raised part keeps the pots elevated. It's very convenient, portable and adaptable. You can even put a heating mat underneath the lid (bottom)
 

Smoke

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Matt, clear tote's turned upside down with a few holes drilled for a little ventilation make good propagating chambers.
And you put the cutting in the tote in water? Ir stick the cutting through a hole and use humidity to grow the roots? Sorry I'm co fused by this
DSC_00050001.JPG
 

Smoke

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lol thank you i was thinking something completely different, makes sense now , do you recommend full sun ?or part shade as well
Thanks, I have no idea about your climate and what they will take.
 

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Plants in closed or semi closed containers in full sun is not a good idea. Temps can get really high in there. Good light level is important but not too much direct sun.
 

MattE

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Plants in closed or semi closed containers in full sun is not a good idea. Temps can get really high in there. Good light level is important but not too much direct sun.
i was also told when propagating that roots dont like light and that you want to keep the roots covered from the sun? also alot of people are saying if you propagate and there are no roots you should defoliate most of it so it can support its self? ehsd your 2 cents on this ?
 

Shibui

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I don't think it is light that roots don't like. I have cuttings in water on a bench inside the window with plenty of light. Roots very happy and showing no sign of growing either toward or away from the light. I suspect that the reason for this misconception is that few roots grow above ground so people assume roots don't like light. I suspect the real reason is more about humidity/ water or lack of it. Air above ground level is dry so roots cannot function there so do not grow.
Balancing the amount of leaf is important. Without roots the cuttings can't take in much water but leaves continue to transpire water to the air and the cutting may dehydrate. Removing some leaves will reduce water demands as will keeping a high humidity around the cuttings. However leaves can also produce the sugars needed to drive growth of new roots so leaving some green is important. Some evergreen species cannot survive defoliation so cuttings without leaves will fail.
 

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