Black masses on trunk of Chinese Elm

cole morton

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I recently purhased this Chinese Elm. These black lumps span the entire length of the trunk. If anyone could tell me what these are I would be very appreciative, as I have found nothing online so far
 

sorce

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Probly just another Bitch Ass white mite shot an unarmed black mite.

It's a protest!

Sorce
 

Cadillactaste

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Make sure when working it...you sterilize ALL tools or you will cross contaminate your other trees. I was told to spray Lysol onto my tools and wipe down at each cut on the tree with the disease. (Had a landscape shrub with it. We ended up burning it. The gall was so over taking its root system.)
 

GGB

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tree cancer?? just when I thought I was finally armed to fight anything...
 

cole morton

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Well im very disapointed to hear that, i was thrilled when I bought this tree for $55 USD. I geuss it was too good to be true. Im concerned about spreaing as some of you mentioned, is this a tree you reccomend getting rid of?20170830_153626.jpg
 

moke

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In animals, a tumor develops when a cell (or group of cells) loses the built-in controls that regulate its growth, often as a result of mutations. Plants can experience the same phenomenon, along with cancerous masses, but it tends to be brought on via infection. Fungi, bacteria, viruses, and insect infestation have all been tied to plant cancers. Oak trees, for example, often grow tumors that double as homes for larvae.The good news for plants is that even though they’re susceptible to cancer, they’re less vulnerable to its effects. For one thing, a vegetable tumor won’t metastasize. That’s because plant cells are typically locked in place by a matrix of rigid cell walls, so they can’t migrate. Even when a plant cell begins dividing uncontrollably, the tumor it creates remains stuck in one place usually with minor effects on the plant’s health—like a burl in a redwood tree.
I wouldn't get rid of it myself it not something that is contagious, I like the looks of it myself :rolleyes::D
 

moke

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Maybe just treat for fungus and insects be cautious with tools as @cadillactase stated and let it grow. If you would rather not chance it send it to me and I will euthanize it for you :(;):D
 

cole morton

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In animals, a tumor develops when a cell (or group of cells) loses the built-in controls that regulate its growth, often as a result of mutations. Plants can experience the same phenomenon, along with cancerous masses, but it tends to be brought on via infection. Fungi, bacteria, viruses, and insect infestation have all been tied to plant cancers. Oak trees, for example, often grow tumors that double as homes for larvae.The good news for plants is that even though they’re susceptible to cancer, they’re less vulnerable to its effects. For one thing, a vegetable tumor won’t metastasize. That’s because plant cells are typically locked in place by a matrix of rigid cell walls, so they can’t migrate. Even when a plant cell begins dividing uncontrollably, the tumor it creates remains stuck in one place usually with minor effects on the plant’s health—like a burl in a redwood tree.
I wouldn't get rid of it myself it not something that is contagious, I like the looks of it myself :rolleyes::D
Thanks for your advice, I really don't mind the way the small burls look, in fact I think it adds some character. I was just more concerned about the health of the tree/risk of the burls spreading to my other trees. If the risk of the disease spreading to my other trees is low I am not too worried. I will be careful with tool cleaning, Thanks!
 

GrimLore

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Return it - the investment of time and chemicals would be overwhelming and OK if it was a 100 year old plant - trust me on this, been up and down the road a few times.

Grimmy
 

cole morton

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There is nothing wrong with your tree. That is a perfectly normal growth pattern with cork bark Chinese elms.
Thanks for your input, I truly hope so.
Since there is no consensus as of yet wether my tree is healthy or not I thought I would share another closup of the suspect bark on one of the branches20170831_153426.jpg
 

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