Bloom Science

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Couldn't find a thread on the horticultural impacts on blooms. I.e. water, fert, temps, genetics of the variety, treatment in prior growing period, winter care, etc. Any suggested great reads or discussions?

Thanks and bring on the bloom show!!!!...!
 

Cypress187

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No expert here, but i thought blooming is done by feeding massive amounts of phosphorus (the second ingredient in any fertilizer, the NPK ratio on the label will say something like 2-10-2).
 
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No expert here, but i thought blooming is done by feeding massive amounts of phosphorus (the second ingredient in any fertilizer, the NPK ratio on the label will say something like 2-10-2).
Ditto on not an expert, but this reminds me of one of my curiousities pertaining to various ferts. I for one have never used any of the "blooming" fertilizers on my trees for fear it might interfere with its vegetative growth or 'force' too much energy into popping a bunch of flowers. This of course would be misguided if all the blooming fert does is help with blooming. Anyway...
 

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Couldn't find a thread on the horticultural impacts on blooms. I.e. water, fert, temps, genetics of the variety, treatment in prior growing period, winter care, etc. Any suggested great reads or discussions?
Most of that information is plant specific and usually not covered in depth in Bonsai. There are some that experiment but growers use a combination of light and nutrients to control bloom. That is way you may see fully blooming "hothouse" Azaleas in the dead of Winter indoors and many other plants. Easy to do with the correct species actually and have done it by accident and learned about it later from a greenhouse grower - these bloomed on 2/19/2014 with harsh winter weather outdoors -

Breaks Rules.JPG

This Tulip was a more recent experiment and bloomed indoors this past January. It is now done and remains in the Vegetable drawer for 1 full month. I will then attempt to wake it up again -

IMG_0209.JPG

Each plant reacts differently and most need different treatment to force bloom. Many people use Blossom Blaster waking them up. Every type is different like those two examples.

The Azalea required the same heat but far less light for simulated sleep. The Tulip bulb requires actually cooling it off for a period to simulate sleep. Both required the same wake up call with an increase of light and water.

The subject is fascinating and could be an enormous thread if many species were documented. I just play with a few on occasion. One time I also had poinsettia growing for a few years and found if I kept them in low light all season they grew nicely. Took a few attempts but finally figured out a month in the closet prior to the holidays would have them in full bloom throughout December.

Grimmy
 

GrimLore

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I for one have never used any of the "blooming" fertilizers on my trees for fear it might interfere with its vegetative growth or 'force' too much energy into popping a bunch of flowers.
On another thread I found this explanation(although not properly typed) that makes sense to me - @Jacos said:

"If you on wants to practice the feeding advice of this Kinbon bonsai magazine you should do it correct.

Give a cheminal (or inorganic) fertiliser NPK 0,10,10 And add (organic)seaweed for the micro elements (Co, Ca, Zn ect..) plus the slow release of small amounts of N.

BTW Zero N is impossible, a tree always needs a minimum of some (small) amounts N.

Thats why the Jap magazine proposes to give seaweed."

Grimmy
 

0soyoung

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Flower buds are just 'Apical Meristems Gone Wild!' ($29.95 for the DVD). Apical meristems, of course, are in the terminal bud of every shoot. When the plant has become competent (reached the equivalent of puberty), a number of factors cause the vegetative bud to morph into a flower bud. Supposing that is true (and it is) ...
 
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On another thread I found this explanation(although not properly typed) that makes sense to me - @Jacos said:

"If you on wants to practice the feeding advice of this Kinbon bonsai magazine you should do it correct.

Give a cheminal (or inorganic) fertiliser NPK 0,10,10 And add (organic)seaweed for the micro elements (Co, Ca, Zn ect..) plus the slow release of small amounts of N.

BTW Zero N is impossible, a tree always needs a minimum of some (small) amounts N.

Thats why the Jap magazine proposes to give seaweed."

Grimmy
My most interesting Toyo Nishiki bloom was last year after they were covered in ice off and on 3 times, once looking like an ice sculpture I kid you not. The chojubai I've also noticed are very different color depending on the year and sometimes time of year. I'm relatively new to satsuki but love 'em.
 

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