Bonsai Direct Japan

bonhe

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Did you buy anything from that site yet? Bonhe
 

bonsai barry

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I'm a bit confused. If I understand our custom's law correctly in the U.S. It wouldn't be practical to ship individual trees to the U.S. I think this site is probably meant for Europeans (the fact that prices are in Euros is a clue).
 

rockm

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Not necessarily...

If you've got the cash and the time, you could probably arrange to import one of these trees to the US. There are more than a few hoops to jump through.

I'd think you might be able to find comparable trees already in the U.S. though, but some of the species (ume, Japanese clover and a few others) are all that common here...
 
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Don't know if US Agriculture laws have changed lateley but it used to be anything with soil on it comming into the US had to go into quarenteen someplace. It would be held for some specefied time, like months, to make sure there were no deseases or pests in the soil. It would also be fumigated. Technology may have changed but 20 years ago that fumigation process tended to dry out the plants and they would die unless given immediate emergency care. The quarenteen site didn't much worry about the plant living or dieing since it wasn't their property.

As I said, all this may have changed by now but I'd look into the process before ordering. Deciduos trees could be bare rooted, all soil removed and not have to go through the process. But there also may be some kind of bugs that still would require fumigation.
 

greerhw

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Think outside the box for a second, these are all shohin trees, nowhere did I see the word legal mentioned, you roll the dice and take your chances.

Ciao,
Harry
 

shohin kid

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I'm a bit confused. If I understand our custom's law correctly in the U.S. It wouldn't be practical to ship individual trees to the U.S.

The time that they need to be quarantined I believe is two years. You can buy trees in Japan that have already been quarantined. If I remember correctly, there are about 8 quarantine greenhouses in the United States. I know there is one here in St. Louis, because our club quarantines material imported from Japan for conventions and workshops. I believe Dave Kreutz owns that green house. Probably because he imports so many satsuki azaleas.
 

rockm

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"Think outside the box for a second, these are all shohin trees, nowhere did I see the word legal mentioned, you roll the dice and take your chances."

Can you say "seized at US point of entry?":D:eek::D
 

greerhw

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"Think outside the box for a second, these are all shohin trees, nowhere did I see the word legal mentioned, you roll the dice and take your chances."

Can you say "seized at US point of entry?":D:eek::D

If you say so........:eek:

Harry
 

Bonsai Nut

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All I can say is that I can vouch for this vendor. It is up to you to research customs, etc, and figure out what works and what doesn't for your country/market. I have been very satisfied with my dealings with them. If you are interested, I would drop them an email - I would guess that customs around the world are almost as complicated as tax laws, and they seem to be applied rather arbitrarily. I have to admit that I can't figure them out for the U.S. There are national customs laws, and state customs laws, and even regional customs laws.
 

irene_b

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All I can say is that I can vouch for this vendor. It is up to you to research customs, etc, and figure out what works and what doesn't for your country/market. I have been very satisfied with my dealings with them. If you are interested, I would drop them an email - I would guess that customs around the world are almost as complicated as tax laws, and they seem to be applied rather arbitrarily. I have to admit that I can't figure them out for the U.S. There are national customs laws, and state customs laws, and even regional customs laws.
Greg is this the same one that you recieved a tree from recently?
Irene
 

rockm

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APHIS requirements

A search on bonsai US Import turned up this document:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicati...table_version/PlantInspectionStations2007.pdf

It contains the outline of a number of ways to import plants, including bonsai. Specifics aren't really mentioned, but it does say because of past instances of bonsai as vectors for insect (Asian Longhorned beetle in particular) importation requirements have gotten more stringent for bonsai.

It does mention some permits, most notably a phytosanitary certificate from the plant's country of origin. It says plants with that documentation can be shipped directly to a qualified facility in the US. It also says you can apply to bring up to 12 barerooted plants into the country with your baggage.

I suspect heavily agricultural states like Cal. and Fla. and Mexican border states like Ariz. might have additional rules and practices on what can be brought in.
 

Attila Soos

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I've seen it happening, if you find the "right" point of entry. There is "right" point and there is "wrong" point of entry in this country. Once you've found the right one, all you have to do is drive your car and pick it up.:)
 

bretts

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Am I mistaken or is it only mini's that they have for sale?
 

JasonG

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A search on bonsai US Import turned up this document:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publicati...table_version/PlantInspectionStations2007.pdf

It contains the outline of a number of ways to import plants, including bonsai. Specifics aren't really mentioned, but it does say because of past instances of bonsai as vectors for insect (Asian Longhorned beetle in particular) importation requirements have gotten more stringent for bonsai..
The problem with that document is that it isn't very clear and doesn't really pertain to the current state of the USDA. With the import restricitons of all trees going from Japan to Europe it won't be long before we adopt that as well and all trees will stop coming in.

It does mention some permits, most notably a phytosanitary certificate from the plant's country of origin. It says plants with that documentation can be shipped directly to a qualified facility in the US. It also says you can apply to bring up to 12 bare rooted plants into the country with your baggage..

A qualified facility in the US is a certified greenhouse for a 2 year quarantine. Doesn't matter what Japan, Taiwan, etc says about the state of the tree, America makes you do the 2 year thing. That is why properly imported trees cost so much. In Japan they are dirt cheap, a trident over there will cost $250 or so but fetch a $1200-$1500 price here in the states.

As for the 12 bare rooted plants...... not worth it! They can't be juniper, they can't be pine and they can't be bonsai. The rules basically allow you to bring in a seedling, which we can buy over here for a few dollars per plant.

I suspect heavily agricultural states like Cal. and Fla. and Mexican border states like Ariz. might have additional rules and practices on what can be brought in.
There is always a loop hole here.....
 

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