Bonsai in the tropics

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#21
Pinus radiata - the Monterey pine. is often used for pine plantations in tropical climates, also used for pine plantations are hybrids with Pinus radiata. I have seen photos of P. radiata used as bonsai. Because of longer needle length, I would go for larger size bonsai with this species or group of hybrids.

As to a care guide, P. radiata is not hardy in my part of USA, so I never really investigated it. I believe it is a multiple flush pine, so the care and techniques recommended for Japanese Black Pine should work well for this one. You will have to adjust the calendar of when techniques are applied to your growing area, but the techniques should work.
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#22
Attached is a photo of the weeping bottlebrush I mentioned, still in its nursery bag. First branch from the top is now clearly the new apex, the next branchlet down, is the one I cut the tip off of as an experiment to see what would happen. You can see it has split into two.

The other photo is three baby acacias, which I also chopped the tops off of to see what would happen. I'm looking to pot them as a group when they are finished.

Needless to say these trees have a long way to go, I can't wait to start. Will post updates. Also if anyone can identify what species of acacia that is, be much appreciated.
cheers
 

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Marlon

Seedling
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#23
Leo! Thanks a million, we do have these, they're sold in most of the nurseries here! Also because they're usually sold in bulk, they're very cheap. Pictures of new plants will be coming soon. In terms of bonsai size, im still having a bit of trouble getting the idea properly set mentally. Its been very long since I last saw an actual bonsai, and the pictures...lets just say I don't understand the concept as well I would like to.

How tall?How wide? Ideal trunk girth?Pot size and shape?
 

Anthony

Imperial Masterpiece
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#24
Try 2.5 cm trunk to 15 cm height as a guideline,

Look up - Ball bearing principle

See Ausbonsai - for Bottlebrush
Good Day
Anthony
 
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#25
Since you are in the tropics, you have no need to grow your trees indoors. Bigger is better. I would shoot for trees somewhere between 1 meter tall and 1.5 meters tall, generally with trunks of at least 20 cm diameters, or bigger.

Your trees are young, need to bulk thos trunks up, so you have a few seasons of growing to do. Now would be the time to put some movement into the trunks, the first 10 cm of a trunk needs to be interesting. Your bottle brush needs some movement to be wired into those straight trunks and branches.
 

petegreg

Masterpiece
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#27
What about olives? Found this olive natural distribution map...
Natural-unmanaged-distribution-of-Olea-europaea-ssp-europaea-and-O-e-cuspidata.png
... and more, Operculicarya and maybe some subtropicals could adjust.
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#28
Try 2.5 cm trunk to 15 cm height as a guideline,

Look up - Ball bearing principle

See Ausbonsai - for Bottlebrush
Good Day
Anthony
Anthony

I haven't looked up the ball bearing principle yet, but I had already looked at Ausbonsai, in fact thats where I found the name for the bottlebrush tree I have. I also picked up another bottlebrush, it could be melaleuca rigidus/citrinus.

So thats 2.5cm in trunk girth to 15cm height?

Thanks
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#29
B
What about olives? Found this olive natural distribution map...
View attachment 209723
... and more, Operculicarya and maybe some subtropicals could adjust.
Operculicarya I have to look up Peter, but I know olives grown here, i had one. It was killed when I had the garden cleaned up. It was cut in half first, i kept watering, and it sprouted again, only to be cut again. The damage was too much!

Cheers!
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#30
Leo has also graciously offered to come and lift when
needed ------ ha ha ha.
Good Day
Anthony
hahahahha!! On a serious note though, I gather a tree that size will definitely have some weight. I'm on the prowl for people I could get interested in the hobby. I need atleast one good tree before I can try anything.


Also on a totally different but related note. I got a ficus yesterday, and its a beauty. Really healthy, I spent a while looking around online trying to determine the species, and no luck. I will post photos once I get home.
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#31
Also any ideas on making bonsai pots? I am currently using cut up plastic bottles and colanders as pots? I have a tiny duranta that has enough character and taper on the trunk to style, but no pot. I have access to gravel, normal sand, normal cement( nothing quick drying or colored(for now)) Also no access to ready-made molds either.

Considering most all pots sold here are made for landscaping purposes, the dimensions render them useless for bonsai. I would like to make my own. I've done research on proportions and shapes but have no experience in the actual making. Hoping to hear back from anyone with experience making decent pots with only the most basic materials.

Cheers
 

Anthony

Imperial Masterpiece
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#32
Marlon,

the 1 to 6 bit is trunk diameter to height [ 2.5 cm to 15 cm ]

Youtube has excellent articles on Concrete or Pottery bonsai pots - how to make.
GoodDay
Anthony
 

Marlon

Seedling
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#33
Marlon,

the 1 to 6 bit is trunk diameter to height [ 2.5 cm to 15 cm ]

Youtube has excellent articles on Concrete or Pottery bonsai pots - how to make.
GoodDay
Anthony

Yes, I found a channel, Bonsai Tricks and a lot more, is the name. The process is simple, materials very basic, and the pots are quite good!

Cheers!
 

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