Bonsai Pepper - Growing Indoors From Seed To Bonchi

SlowMovingWaters

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Lately I've been reading about Bonchi (Bonsai Peppers/Chilli) wondering if I could grow them indoors under artificial light. After much research it is advisable to grow the plant to full size outdoors then cut down and bring indoors. Much like bonsai are field grown, they are grown to size outdoors. Since it is fall/winter here in Maine I have started them indoor in 10" pots. Most are already sprouted and some are still in the mail.

This thread will be a place I can journal the progress of these Bonchi.

To start this thread here is a picture of the biggest one so far (Banana Pepper) and an overview. Sorry for the hard water stains in the tent I'll be cleaning it soon.

I hope you enjoy
 

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SlowMovingWaters

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It has now been 8 days and the peppers are sprouting/growing. I've decided to grow 1 of each type of pepper to find out which will be best or if all do well.

The peppers are as follows Sweet Banana, Hugarian Hot Wax, Mini Bell, Pepperoncini, Medusa, Big Jim, and Murasaki. For now I'll just show you the biggest one (Pepperoncini).
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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I would think in the long run, the pepper varieties that have smaller peppers, would be more proportioal. Banana, and Hungarian Wax peppers are rather large.

Also look for the more "wild types" for example "Chillie Arbol", the name means "Tree Pepper", it is a wild type native to Mexico desert regions, and has a natural tree like appearance. The 'Pequin' pepper is quite similar to Chillie Arbol.

The types grown in Central and south America are more likely to be longer lived perennial, where the ones developed for northern gardening will likely be more seasonal.
 

SlowMovingWaters

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I would think in the long run, the pepper varieties that have smaller peppers, would be more proportioal. Banana, and Hungarian Wax peppers are rather large.

Also look for the more "wild types" for example "Chillie Arbol", the name means "Tree Pepper", it is a wild type native to Mexico desert regions, and has a natural tree like appearance. The 'Pequin' pepper is quite similar to Chillie Arbol.

The types grown in Central and south America are more likely to be longer lived perennial, where the ones developed for northern gardening will likely be more seasonal.

Thanks for the great advise.

Medusa and Mini Bell are smaller peppers. But I do see your point smaller peppers would be more desirable. However the various varieties were picked because they are almost all good for eating. I don't personally like eating peppers but know many people who do and give the peppers away for free. I just like growing them. These plants will be grown fairly large and will produce peppers before cutting back to grow the trunk thickness. In the end it's all an experiment.
 

SlowMovingWaters

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It has now been 10 days since the last pictures and as of today all of the peppers have sprouted.

As a side note I've also planted some heirloom Marigold "Tagets" from seed saved 3 or 4 years ago stored in the freezer. Hopefully to see if it can be bonsai as well.

On to the pictures

The big plant is the Pepperoncini same as last time. Next pic is also Pepperoncini from above. Next is Purple Murasaki showing a beautiful purple color to it's baby leaves. Lastly there is an overview. Hope you enjoy
 

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Leo in N E Illinois

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Ah yes, the Chilli Arbol, and the Pequin peppers I have eaten, and used in cooking. They are hot, about twice as hot as a commercial jalapeno. I consider grocery store jalapeno to be the dividing line between mild and medium heat peppers. The Chilli Arbol and the Pequin are similar to the small Thai bird peppers, just not quite as hot as the Thai peppers. Definitely use in moderation if you are not acclimated to "really hot" food. But more so than commercial peppers they are long lived perennials, with woody stems.

The small Thai bird peppers would be another variety to use for bonsai.

The wild types and the types bred for tropical climates, such as the Thai peppers, will tend to be more perennial in their growth habits.

I like fire hot food, at least occasionally. Not every week, but especially if there are complex flavors behind the heat, like in Thai curries, the combination of heat and complex flavors is delightful.
 

SlowMovingWaters

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I know this isn't a pepper but I had to try growing it. Below is Spirea Candy Corn. If it survives until spring it will most likely be planted in the apartment shared garden. Almost no one plants anything in the garden besides me planting peppers each summer.100_0725.jpg
 

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Here's an update to the peppers. Some of the weaker plants were culled. Only the strongest remain.

Sorry for the quality. As you can see the peppers are starting to flower. Shown below is Hungarian Hot Wax

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The 3 bigger ones are flowering now and the smaller ones are still putting on new growth.
 

SlowMovingWaters

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First up is not a pepper it actually my Candy Corn Spirea. I'm growing it indoors until may when it can go outside to grow into a beautiful flowering bush.

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Next is a side view of the Pepperoncini pepper with quite a thick main trunk already

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Next is the sweet purple pepper I forgot it's name

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Lastly an overview

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I just bought a Micro Miniature Rose bush called "Citrine" that will make a beautiful addition to the indoor garden. Also ordered a dwarf everbearing Mulberry to develop into bonsai.
 

Carol 83

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First up is not a pepper it actually my Candy Corn Spirea. I'm growing it indoors until may when it can go outside to grow into a beautiful flowering bush.

View attachment 347784

Next is a side view of the Pepperoncini pepper with quite a thick main trunk already

View attachment 347785

Next is the sweet purple pepper I forgot it's name

View attachment 347786

Lastly an overview

View attachment 347787

I just bought a Micro Miniature Rose bush called "Citrine" that will make a beautiful addition to the indoor garden. Also ordered a dwarf everbearing Mulberry to develop into bonsai.
Love that Candy Corn Spirea.
 

SlowMovingWaters

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Time for an update.

Some peppers got culled due to being weak or not growing fast enough plus I needed room. Here is whats left.

Pepperoncini

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Purple Sweet Pepper

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Hungarian Hot Wax Pepper

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Banana Pepper

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Mini Bell Pepper

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Overview

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