Bonsai pots for flowering trees

Peter44

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
519
Location
NE Oregon
USDA Zone
5-6
I have several flowering trees, Azalais and Crab Apple, and want to buy or make some pots for them. I am assuming that one has to watch that the glaze does not offend the tree in flower so you would end up with pots that are pretty much a solid color or even unglazed pots?? I also wonder about shiny glazes verses matt or something else that should be used. Help appreciated!
 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
28,333
Reaction score
38,453
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
It depends on the amount of flowers, type, size, duration, leaves or no leaves, bark color, etc...

Sorce
 

Peter44

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
519
Location
NE Oregon
USDA Zone
5-6
It depends on the amount of flowers, type, size, duration, leaves or no leaves, bark color, etc...

Sorce
Azalais and crabs...you know way more about the "amount of flowers, type, size, duration, leaves or no leaves, bark color etc" than I do Capt
 

Shibui

Masterpiece
Messages
2,879
Reaction score
5,460
Location
Yackandandah, Australia
USDA Zone
9?
Most trees change through the year so it can be daunting to try to find a pot that matches all the faces of a particular bonsai. To make it a bit easier, pick the best feature of your tree, the time you most want to show it off. With many flowering species that feature will be the flowers but with a crab apple it may be the fruit on bare branches.

Evergreen Azaleas can get away with unglazed because they don't lose leaves so there is still some color even in winter but most seem to pick a glazed pot where the color works with the flower color. You need to do some research on color matching. The colors can be complimentary or contrasting and still get a great effect.
In most cases your tree will still look good even when the tree is not in flower.
 

Brian Van Fleet

Pretty Fly for a Bonsai Guy
Messages
12,132
Reaction score
34,271
Location
B’ham, AL
USDA Zone
8A
Plant them in pots that correspond with the time of year you plan to showcase. For example, a crabapple could be prepped for a spring show, so the pot should compliment the flowers. If it’s to be showed in fruit, pick a pot that compliments the fruits.

Complimentary colors are those across from each other on a color wheel. So if you are showing a tree with red/pink flowers, green is the complimentary color to use. If the crabapple has orange fruits, blue is the complimentary color. This is super basic, but from this understanding, it is easy to explore outward.


DD82CAF4-3A5D-49F6-8A23-252AA3A48F62.jpeg

Shiny vs matte glazes: pots should indicate/compliment the age of the tree. Old trees look best in old, subtle pots. Young trees, or those styled to portray young trees can go in newer, shinier, brighter pots.

Several good, older threads discuss pots as well...worth reading.

 

sorce

Nonsense Rascal
Messages
28,333
Reaction score
38,453
Location
Berwyn, Il
USDA Zone
6.2
👆👍🏼❤️🧡💛💚💙💜!

It's important to consider the entire display as well, even if this is your backyard, or a single traditional display, or a shohin stand.

A strong blue accent can serve as opposition on the color wheel, then you can pair your tree more closely in color to it's pot.

Something like a flowering bush in the yard, siding color, fence, etc may determine the best use of things of only to be enjoyed at home.

With all the excellent information above, the farther you dive into particular details, the more enjoyment you'll always get out of it.

I think the most important question is, will it be the standout in a shohin box? Then you'll use rules a little more loosely, but in context of many other aspects.
If it will be solo, there will be less context to play off of, so "mistakes" or "broken rules" may be to uncomfortable to enjoy.

Sorce
 

Peter44

Chumono
Messages
826
Reaction score
519
Location
NE Oregon
USDA Zone
5-6
Thank you all for the great info! That chart Brian is huge!
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom