Bonsai purchase

CWTurner

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Thanksgiving I traveled to Atlanta to visit family and fit in a visit to Plant City Bonsai.
Enjoyed my time there and Steve's hospitality.
I also made my first significant bonsai purchase, this Japanese Red Pine. It was dug from a field last January at Muranaka's if I remember correctly.
20161203_141741.jpg
I like the bark. Maybe I'll do some wiring next spring and think about where to take it down the road.
Any comments?
CW
 

Anthony

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Strange how after a while all of our soils - look - very similar.
Congrats and best of growing.
Good Day
Anthony
 

Guy Vitale

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That's a nice tree to start learning on, study up all you can on the growth habits of a JRP, and where you want to go with this tree. Learn as much as you can on proper wiring, it truly makes all the difference. This site is a great reference for both. Good luck.
 

0soyoung

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Congratulations.
I'm curious what you saw in this tree (other than the bark, which is quite nice).
In other words, what do you envision it to become as a bonsai?
 

CWTurner

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Looks tall, how big is it?
19" tall. 11" pot and about 1 -1/2" trunk diameter above the root bulge.
In other words, what do you envision it to become as a bonsai?
I'm not so sure that I like the planting angle. It looks like the roots on the left protrude too much and those on the right are buried. I certainly don't think that I'll change that in 2017 because its not been in this pot long. But I think a more upright tree might work.
The bottom of the trunk has some movement that doesn't show well in my photo.
It definitely needs less upward direction in the branches, and I'll see how much of that I can introduce (but I hear these are brittle trees).
No hurry, I'll enjoy caring for it and considering future possibilities.
CW
 
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0soyoung

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No hurry, I'll enjoy caring for it and considering future possibilities.
I asked because I only imagine chopping it just above the lowest branches or just the heavy one above that, but it is very hard for me to imagine how it then looks from the left or 180. So I figured you must have seen something from this side (hence the reason for the orientation in your pic) - always interested in anything that can train my eye.

But let me say that chopping above the low heavy branch and making the front be somewhere on the left (as seen in you pic) might work. The fairly taperless trunk would slant away, so the perspective might make it appear to taper (i.e., disguise this 'fault'). Then the heavy branch is a continuation of the trunk coming toward the front - makes the tree 'friendly'. The rootage might be pleasing from this side. yadda yadda yadda.

... visions of sugar plums ...
 

Eric Group

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I asked because I only imagine chopping it just above the lowest branches or just the heavy one above that, but it is very hard for me to imagine how it then looks from the left or 180. So I figured you must have seen something from this side (hence the reason for the orientation in your pic) - always interested in anything that can train my eye.

But let me say that chopping above the low heavy branch and making the front be somewhere on the left (as seen in you pic) might work. The fairly taperless trunk would slant away, so the perspective might make it appear to taper (i.e., disguise this 'fault'). Then the heavy branch is a continuation of the trunk coming toward the front - makes the tree 'friendly'. The rootage might be pleasing from this side. yadda yadda yadda.

... visions of sugar plums ...
Wish this had been don to the tree when it was younger... coulda been a nice one!
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Let's see some other sides of the tree. Are you hoping to use the whole tree, or make the best bonsai possible, even if it ends up significantly smaller? You may have a decent shohin in the trunk and first branch.

Also remember that JRP is brittle, and anything over pencil-thick will snap right off if you hurriedly bend it past about 45°. This means planning, raffia, and patience.
 

CWTurner

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But let me say that chopping above the low heavy branch and making the front be somewhere on the left (as seen in you pic) might work. The fairly taperless trunk would slant away, so the perspective might make it appear to taper (i.e., disguise this 'fault'). Then the heavy branch is a continuation of the trunk coming toward the front - makes the tree 'friendly'.

Yes, I see what you mean. On closer inspection, the trunk is unremarkable aside from the bark. All the movement is higher up. Guess I'm not a great bonsai shopper.
I will certainly consider your suggestions. Thanks!

Let's see some other sides of the tree. Are you hoping to use the whole tree, or make the best bonsai possible, even if it ends up significantly smaller? You may have a decent shohin in the trunk and first branch.

I didn't purchase this with any real plans, I just liked the tree. I'm reluctant to chop it right away, but after I look at it awhile, I might realize what you and @osoyung see now will be the best way to train the tree.
Maybe I can air layer the top curvy part? I've done that with my EWP.

This is my first ever video, so be gentle


CW
 

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