Bradford Pear...I think.....

Michael P

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If these are volunteers that you collected, they are probably more similar to Callery pear, the wild ancestor of Bradford. I've had a Callerypear for over 20 years. It isn't a bonsai, the aesthetics are wrong. More of a potted topiary freak with coiled roots, but I maintain it with bonsai techniques. It is REALLY easy, almost bullet proof.

Yours look interesting! I think the species would work well for multi-trunk or clump style since it is so eager to grow root sprouts.
 

Cmd5235

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5th one down is a pear. Others probably crabapple.

I have a lot at my disposal too, but most grow a deep tap root I don't care to deal with. I have two I'm dealing with at the moment.
Thanks for the ID update. Fortunately these didn’t have a whole lot of a tap root, so they came out easily and have been pushing growth well.
 

AlainK

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Something new for me, I've discovered a species I had never heard before. It seems it is much more common in the US, I read on the French version of Wikipedia :

Pyrus calleryana :

(...) L'arbre qui a survécu aux attentats du 11 septembre 2001 à Manhattan est un Pyrus calleryana (...)

Good luck with your trees 👍
 

Cmd5235

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Something new for me, I've discovered a species I had never heard before. It seems it is much more common in the US, I read on the French version of Wikipedia :

Pyrus calleryana :

(...) L'arbre qui a survécu aux attentats du 11 septembre 2001 à Manhattan est un Pyrus calleryana (...)

Good luck with your trees 👍
Thank you!
 

meushi

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Something new for me, I've discovered a species I had never heard before. It seems it is much more common in the US, I read on the French version of Wikipedia :

Pyrus calleryana :

(...) L'arbre qui a survécu aux attentats du 11 septembre 2001 à Manhattan est un Pyrus calleryana (...)

Good luck with your trees 👍
Alain,

I've got a pair of calleryana, apparently they can easily be propagated by hardwood cuttings if you want some :) The smell of the flowers is "interesting" but they grow fast and bark up quickly.
 
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Im thinking its not bradford due to the deeper serration on leaf edge and overall shape lackong that rounded heartshaped typical of pear
In treework I encounter bradfords left and right and thats just my initial reaction

Still very nice stock I like your choices allot and will be interested to see it progress
 

AlainK

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I've got a pair of calleryana, apparently they can easily be propagated by hardwood cuttings if you want some :)

Well, if you've got one to trade, I'd be happy to get one. I have several trees I can send you in return, from an 80 cm-tall Sequoia sempervirens to a Dunkeld larch, and dozens of 1,2,3 year-old seedlings (Celtis laevigata, Acer palmatum, and a few others).

Let's keep in touch, tell me when you've got something to swap ;)
 
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This is young bradford/callery
 

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