Bradford Pear yamadori from Spring 2018

GrampaMoses

Sapling
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I first collected this guy growing along a fence in the Spring of 2018. I noticed right away the thick trunk with lots of low branches and it was already developing bark. I knew I'd need to pick a trunk line and limit the branches, but I wanted to let it recover first. I'd never worked with Bradford Pear before and didn't know what to expect.

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I pruned it back hard in the spring of 2019 and limited it to 2 major trunks. I wasn't sure if I wanted a twin trunk or if I should decide on one trunk and get rid of the other. I thought I'd let it recover and decide later.

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Looking really healthy today (early 2020) and figured it's time to prune it back and start working on it. The pot is filling nicely with roots.

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On the left is what it looks like currently, after a bit of pruning this afternoon. On the right is my plan to remove the larger left trunk and building upon current major branches, which I'm happy with the placement of.

Before I get my drill bits and carve away that second trunk, I would like input as to whether this is the right direction to take this tree or not. I'm thinking maybe I should remove the right trunk and build upon the left trunk, but I don't like the current branch placement as well for that trunk...

Here are some other views of the tree as it's currently pruned.

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GrampaMoses

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I heave a spot where I can collect some big Bradfords, what time of year is best.
Well I've only dug up the one, so I'm no expert on the species. But same timing as most deciduous trees, early spring as the tree wakes from dormancy and the buds are looking green, but not in leaf yet. See Harry Harrington's website for pictures and more details.

 

Pitoon

Omono
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Interesting, I just cut one down that was about 20ft last week to open up some space for light to come in. I did think about trying to pull it up but I was growing next to a 100ft tulip poplar and didn't want to mess with cutting so many roots. I never burned Bradford pear but I will this upcoming winter.
 

kale

Mame
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Here’s a little one from my yard that practically doubled in size this past summer. I dug it up and cut the taproot off and stuck it back in the ground and with a little fertilizer it definitely outpaced all the other little sapplings in my yard! I have a 20+ footer in my yard that keeps having babies everywhere. 1B64B604-1C70-4813-959C-BE1B7DC16E85.jpeg
 

GrampaMoses

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Here’s a little one from my yard that practically doubled in size this past summer. I dug it up and cut the taproot off and stuck it back in the ground and with a little fertilizer it definitely outpaced all the other little sapplings in my yard! I have a 20+ footer in my yard that keeps having babies everywhere.
Nice bend at the soil line. Luckily these seem to backbud very easily from old wood, so once the trunk gets to the thickness you want, you can trunk chop and work from just above that little bend and rebuild the rest.
 

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