Browning Hinoki

mrcasey

Mame
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I picked up a 2 gallon hinoki cypress in early spring. The plant was growing in nitrolized wood shavings. In April, I turned the tree on its side and repotted into a shorter azalea pot. Some of the fine upper roots were removed. It is now growing in peat, perlite, and pine bark. I've been fertilizing every 4weeks with a 6 week granular fertilizer. The plant thrived until the middle of August. As can be seen in the pic, the foliage tips are turning brown very quickly. I've had the tree in full sun all summer.

Too much fertilizer? Too much direct sun? Thanks for any advice.

best,
Casey
Zone 6a
 

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I would definitely say the August sun... not sure exactly where you are but it has been rather hot this year...
seeing that you are new, I would suggest that you fill out your location in your profile section, it helps others know what kind of conditions you have, when answering any questions you might have.
 

woodguy

Mame
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I keep mine in full sun all summer and I'm also in 6a. I also water a good bit sometimes twice a day when its real hot. Hinokis are pretty thirsty trees and don't like to get too dry. Could be that it dried out too much.
 

Alex DeRuiter

Chumono
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I wonder if it might be wind burn. I hear Hinokis are very susceptible to wind burn...but I don't have any experience with them myself.
 
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to me, most probably spider mites. From the composition of your mix, I feel it is not fast draining so it could be also phytophtora but if, because of your weather the substrate dries every day, it would be less probable.
 
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Vance Wood

Lord Mugo
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It has been my experience that Hinokis exhibiting this problem are usually headed for the happy compost pile. I really hope to be wrong here, believe me.

It is true that Hinokis like more water than most conifers but they do not like having their feet wet. This is one of the reasons you see very few examples of this tree in Japan; they are so difficult to take care of demanding a care regimen specifically to them selves. It is possible that the roots were stressed out enough when you repotted it that it was subsequently over watered causing new roots to rot.

With the Hinokis I have dealt with, one for over twenty years, I have found that they, like Mugo Pines, prefer to be potted during periods of active growth, during the summer. My opinion and my experience, yours to do with as you wish. I know I tend to recomend a lot of things to be done during the summer when the litterature says contrary.
 
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I have to agree with Vance... If a tree fails in summer after being collected or root worked, generally that means the process has failed. I'd put it in at least filtered sunlight at best if it were mine. Sun can make a bad situation worse for a stressed out tree. Especially if it's related to a failure in the root system, as the activity of transpiration in the foliage will overtax the weakened root system. Less sun right now means less work for the tree. If the dieback stops, make sure you protect it well until next spring, when it should get revitalized.

Good luck,

Victrinia
 

mrcasey

Mame
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I've never been good at nursing ailing container trees back to health. My few successes have been a result of putting the sick trees in a shady corner of the garden and
just leaving them for a season or two. I decided to go that route with this hinoki. When I pulled
the tree out of its pot, I saw waterlogged soil mix at the bottom of the container and an infestation of pill bugs.

I love the look of hinokis, but I just can't seem to keep them alive. About 5 years ago, I ordered 6 dwarf hinoki cuttings from Brent Walston. I planted them in a more conventional bonsai substrate but still killed them.

Casey
zone 6
 

cquinn

Shohin
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I've never been good at nursing ailing container trees back to health. My few successes have been a result of putting the sick trees in a shady corner of the garden and
just leaving them for a season or two. I decided to go that route with this hinoki. When I pulled
the tree out of its pot, I saw waterlogged soil mix at the bottom of the container and an infestation of pill bugs.

I love the look of hinokis, but I just can't seem to keep them alive. About 5 years ago, I ordered 6 dwarf hinoki cuttings from Brent Walston. I planted them in a more conventional bonsai substrate but still killed them.

Casey
zone 6

I use akadama, peat moss, and paver sand in equal parts and I have problems controlling all the new growth.
 

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