California Juniper

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If my memory serves me correctly, this was a California juniper that several of us at Boon's Intensive wired on in June of 2005. These trees are always a puzzle to wire well, and a real challenge and learning experience.
 

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Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
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Nice looking tree. Surprisingly thick foilage for a California Juniper. Almost looks like a Shimpaku.
 
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Nice looking tree. Surprisingly thick foilage for a California Juniper. Almost looks like a Shimpaku.
From such a distance, it does look like a shimpaku. Californias tighten up quite well, from what I can see at Boon's. This tree was exhibited in the 2003 World Bonsai Contest. (Note: it's not the same tree).

 

Tachigi

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These trees are always a puzzle to wire well, and a real challenge
I don't get it. Are you talking techniquly or from an artistic approach. What makes them more of a challenge than any other Juniper.
 
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I don't get it. Are you talking techniquly or from an artistic approach. What makes them more of a challenge than any other Juniper.
With yamadori, the chanllenge to wire is technical. Of course styling the tree is an artistic pursuit, but putting wire on well is an art in and of itself. Figuring out where to route your wires, how to use just enough and avoid crossing wires, etc. There are challenges on these branches that you won't find on a fairly well-groomed tree.

This is a close-up of a portion I had to wire. This was about my third Intensive.
 

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Bill S

Masterpiece
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You have handled the challange well Chris.

Yamadori tend to sway from the groomed trees in the structure / branching rules, we are using wild grown trees for thier age, deformaties, stunted(ness), in general rugged appearance. It's kind of a trade off between the naturalistic ruggedness, and the typical artfull styling.

Throw on top of that the age of many yamadori trees often makes bending some branches impossible or risky at the best ( can you say snap). Often a small branch on old stunted juni's could have been set in place for many years, and won't move easily.
 
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Don't think I did all the work on this tree, I wired about half of it. Here's another shot showing the size.
 

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