Can I start airlayers this time of year? Portland, Oregon

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Portland, Oregon, United States of America
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I was wondering if it's still possible for me to start air-layers? I think I'm zone 9b. I have some Chinese elm starters that I want to start growing roots and a large maple clump at my auntie's house I want to take some layers from. I thought it was late in the season for that, but I have been seeing some folks talking about doing layers throughout the season. Perhaps someone in the PNW like @Deep Sea Diver or @parhamr may be able to comment? Please & thank you!
 

Potawatomi13

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Zone 9 only way down SW corner of state (Brookings) area unlesss climate map incorrect. Suspect any time "can" be done but fastest rooting time comes with full growing season. Some trees may take 2 years if at all. Your trees should be pretty easy one season subjects;).
 

Shibui

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You can start layers any time of year but progress will differ with climate conditions as well as the usual plant health and care. If your climate dictates winter protection for the trees and the trees are in pots you could go ahead now because, even if they don't have enough roots to separate before winter the layers will be protected when you move the trees into winter quarters. Whether rooting will be much quicker than a spring layer is something I can't offer help with but sometimes you just have to scratch that itch.

Outdoor layers are subject to winter conditions. Personally i can't see any reason why layer roots would be any more cold sensitive than similar roots in the ground but I don't have any experience of the ridiculous winters you guys experience.
It all boils down to when you will be able to take off your new plants. Late layers generally are not ready until start of winter then dormant or maybe not ready until start of spring when the new tree will survive with a stunning lack of roots.
layers in spring will be rooted in a month or 2 and can be separated before mid summer so in essence there is only a few months difference between late layers and spring layers.
 

Mikecheck123

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Personally i can't see any reason why layer roots would be any more cold sensitive than similar roots in the ground
The ground can stay much warmer than a pot. That's why people say subtract two zones to see what trees will survive your winter (the USDA zones are for roots in the ground).
 
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Portland, Oregon, United States of America
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Thanks for all your replies.
Zone 9 only way down SW corner of state (Brookings) area unlesss climate map incorrect. Suspect any time "can" be done but fastest rooting time comes with full growing season. Some trees may take 2 years if at all. Your trees should be pretty easy one season subjects;).
I forgot you were a Eugenean! I’m in a microclimate according to the usda.gov website. I just double-checked it says 9a.
I think I’ll just wait for next year. I’ve only done one air-layer so far. I don’t want to have less than satisfactory results as a beginner.
 

Deep Sea Diver

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I was wondering if it's still possible for me to start air-layers? I think I'm zone 9b. I have some Chinese elm starters that I want to start growing roots and a large maple clump at my auntie's house I want to take some layers from. I thought it was late in the season for that, but I have been seeing some folks talking about doing layers throughout the season. Perhaps someone in the PNW like @Deep Sea Diver or @parhamr may be able to comment? Please & thank you!
Air layers can be done anytime during the growing season up here. Yet if you delay until now it’s highly likely that the layer will have to winter over.

That said, I wintered over a Sango Kaku this past winter with no issues. For extra protection I covered it with an additional layer of bubble wrap.

If you do choose to winter over I would suggest that you do use one of the disc or basket techniques shown in this forum as the roots grew vigorously. These techniques have the advantage of developing a good nebari and saving time in the process.

cheers
DSD sends
 

Maiden69

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Thanks for all your replies.

I forgot you were a Eugenean! I’m in a microclimate according to the usda.gov website. I just double-checked it says 9a.
I think I’ll just wait for next year. I’ve only done one air-layer so far. I don’t want to have less than satisfactory results as a beginner.
Why wait? The main concern is with cold climate, in a 9a, you should have a few cold spells. I am in a 8a now, but I used to be in a 9A San Antonio, TX before. I am starting 3 air-layers this weekend, a cork bark Japanese maple, a trident and a yoshino cherry tree. depending on the condition of the new roots I may separate by fall or leave them on and separate on spring. They will have to be protected, but in my zone 8b I am not concerned, unless we have a weird winter like this year.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I'm in zone 5b or 6a, depending on what map you use. I routinely have to leave air layers on over winter. I do not change winter protection for air layers. Things like Malus ( crabapples), elms, hinoki, whatever, that I just set on the ground for winter, get the same treatment. If the snow gets deep enough to bury the air layer - great, but it doesn't matter. Roots will resume growing in spring.

There are trees I protect, like Satsuki. And again, the presence of an air layer does not change how I winter a tree.

I have a "pretty good" success rate. Most of my failures were pines, where I average about 25% success. But that is because in general, pines don't air layer, not because of winter.
 

Bonds Guy

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Hmm this thread is making me wonder if I should start an air-layer on a maple tomorrow. I was planning on doing it next year since its about to hit august.

I have a question, Let’s say the roots on the air-layer die. The callus should still be alive, right? Therefore, it would eventually produce new roots
 

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