Carnivorous plants?

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Richmond, VA
USDA Zone
7a
#3
Love em! I tell myself every year I'm going to replant my terrarium, but never do:( maybe this year!

I have an awesome book that describes culture for (I think) all types of carnivorous plants. I was never aware of the aquatic ones, but they are pretty cool too.

I have an indoor setup and was going to try propagating them but now I have to take everything down to make room for a roommate:mad:o_Oo_O
 
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Netherlands
#6
I used to have them, but the winters are too harsh or too mild, causing them to be eaten by bugs or freeze to death.
5 types of drosera, 2 types of VFT, 3 types of sarracenia. But after 8 years they're all gone. I still have the containered bog though. Great source of free peat moss!
 
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Location
SE MI
USDA Zone
5b
#7
I recently bought a couple of Venus flytraps and a Nepenthes of a species I can't recall off the top of my head. They're still just in the adjustment phase; I'm even newer to carnivorous plants than I am to bonsai. They're kinda neat, though.

I still have the containered bog though. Great source of free peat moss!
How do you keep your bog from becoming a mosquito breeding habitat?
 
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Location
Seattle, Washington
#8
Nice collection!
I've got a small number of a couple of types, Sarracenia and Pinguicula



I keep them in pots with the drainage holes sealed up with silicon.
Those look incredible! When you say you sealed the drainage holes with silicone, do you mean that the pots don't have drainage? Should I do that for my carnivorous plants?
 
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Location
Ohio
USDA Zone
6a
#9
I recently bought a couple of Venus flytraps and a Nepenthes of a species I can't recall off the top of my head. They're still just in the adjustment phase; I'm even newer to carnivorous plants than I am to bonsai. They're kinda neat, though.



How do you keep your bog from becoming a mosquito breeding habitat?
It's my understanding that venus flytraps need a light dormancy being from eastern North Carolina and that nepenthes need very high humidity otherwise they may not form pitchers in case you don't know.
 
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277
Location
SE MI
USDA Zone
5b
#10
It's my understanding that venus flytraps need a light dormancy being from eastern North Carolina and that nepenthes need very high humidity otherwise they may not form pitchers in case you don't know.
Yup! Hence why one is an indoor plant and the other is an outdoor plant.
I'd thought VFT was a tropical plant until I actually did the research on it (prior to purchasing - never let it be said that I can't learn from my mistakes!). Plan is to leave them outside until they hit dormancy, then fridge 'em when temps get too cold for them. The pitcher, being a proper tropical, can stay indoors.
 

TomB

Shohin
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S.E. UK
#11
Nice collection!


Those look incredible! When you say you sealed the drainage holes with silicone, do you mean that the pots don't have drainage? Should I do that for my carnivorous plants?
Thanks. Yes, no drainage at all. Lots of water (ideally rain water) in the pots. Or you can keep them in a regular pot, placed in a saucer of water, but that gets messy with algae.
 

JoeR

Masterpiece
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Sandhills of North Carolina
USDA Zone
8a
#12
I recently bought this VFT from Lowe’s and it’s quickly tripled in size, guess I’m doing something right. Just using RODI water so far.

I want HUNDREDS of carnivorous plants now haha. Especially some nepenthes and more VFT. I think my love of them can be traced back to when my parents bought me a red dragon VFT when I was about 7 or so, needless to say that didn’t make it long though. Such amazing plants, and really not too hard to care for so far..
 

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Cofga

Chumono
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Western NC
USDA Zone
7a
#14
I have a number of pitcher plants, sundews, and flytraps. These are grown in 9” deep tubs sunk in the ground with a mix 1:1 mix of peat and sand. I cover them with a 6” layer of pine needles in winter and they make it through fine. We have a local grower that I buy from www.flytrapking.com.
 

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Location
Ohio
USDA Zone
6a
#16
I've been interested in them a while, just haven't obtained any yet. I've looked at doing a tank with heliamphora or cephalotus in particular. The problem with heliamphora is keeping the temperature cool enough. I also just have too many other horticultural interests and only so much space.
 

JoeR

Masterpiece
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Sandhills of North Carolina
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#18
I have a number of pitcher plants, sundews, and flytraps. These are grown in 9” deep tubs sunk in the ground with a mix 1:1 mix of peat and sand. I cover them with a 6” layer of pine needles in winter and they make it through fine. We have a local grower that I buy from www.flytrapking.com.
Didn’t know they existed, nice to know next time I’m up that way.
 

Cofga

Chumono
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683
Location
Western NC
USDA Zone
7a
#19
Didn’t know they existed, nice to know next time I’m up that way.
He does most of his sales via his website. He also often sells them through Eart Fare in the shopping center next to the river in West Asheville. I think he still shows up for the big plant sale out at the big farmers market each spring. He has really nice plants.
 

JoeR

Masterpiece
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Location
Sandhills of North Carolina
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#20
Anyone have experience with nepenthes? Not sure If it’s better inside or out. We have dehumidifiers in the house now so I bet they won’t like it inside too much. I could get a terrarium set up though I suppose. I think this one is nepenthes alata? Is under a bench like this a good spot? I’m struggling to find a place for it with low light but high humidity. I’m already in love though.
 

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