Carpinus koreana - Carpinus turczaninowii

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Mame
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I have seen multiple websites claim theyre the same, and Ive seen multiple websites claim theyre different and also sell them separately. What gives? Also believe Ive seen it spelled "coreana". Need expert advice.
 

cmeg1

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Coreana var.
It has smaller more rounded leaves whereas regular turczaninowii has more pointed leaves and bigger internodes too.
Coreana is more dwarf line in habit and nature...slower growing a bit too
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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Reading the IPNI database, I'll admit just skimming,
The botanical nomenclature is not "settled". It all depends on which "authorities you read.

Settled taxonomy - Carpinus koreana is nomen nudum - a misspelling, and therefore an incorrect name. An orthographic error. The correct spelling is Carpinus coreana.

Some authorities consider Carpinus coreana to be a valid species.
Some authorities consider the type specimens labelled Carpinus coreana to represent Carpinus turczaninowii period. NOT a subspecies of C. turczaninowii. These would label all Carpinus coreana simply as Carpinus turczaninowii, without any further descriptors.

Similarly, there are those that believe the herbarium specimens labelled Carpinus turczaninowii all really are Carpinus coreana, without the addition of any subspecies descriptions.

I do not know if the name Carpinus turczaninowii var. coreana has been legitimately (according to IPNI rules) published. But I have seen this name used often.

The point is, that all these names are equally correct except Carpinus koreana, that is the only name that is absolutely invalid.

So YES, to Carpinus coreana, Carpinus turczaninowii, and to Carpinus turczaninowii var coreana.

Until there is a monograph published doing a revision of the genus Carpinus, I doubt this will be settled beyond this level.
 

Ohmy222

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I have had both at one point or another and I definitely believe there is a difference in the bark and fall color. The coreana's have that smooth, muscular bark, almost identical to american hornbeam where as the turczaninowii I used to have had a less muscular look and had ridges. I didn't notice a difference in leaf size or growth habit but the fall color was better on the coreana. The coreana's I have or had came from either Matt Ouwinga, Evergreen Gardenworks, or seeds from Schumachers. I don't have the turczaninowii any longer as it died when I moved a while back.
 

AlainK

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I definitely believe there is a difference in the bark and fall color.

Perhaps, I tend to believe you, but there are genetic variations in the same species that doesn't mean they are new species.

I remember visiting the INRA years ago, they were growing different species from different places and environment. Among them, Fagus sylvatica from different parts of France. In the fields, the difference in growth was evident, yet they were the same species. That's what they are doing in Britain because of the disease that threatens them : finding those that are resistant to the disease that is plaguing the forests there. It's like children in the same family. We were three : two with blond hair and blue eyes, one with brown hair and green eyes.

The more genetic diversity there is, the more a living group can resist pests and diseases : I heard that almost all the Metasequoia glyptostroboides planted outside China all came from seeds brought back in 1948. Since then, people have tried to renew the genetics of these to ensure they will be more resistant to any bacterial, fungal, or pest attacks.

This being said, what Leo wrote is the best explanation I've read so far. Very clear.
 

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