Carving Help!!

docs_bonsai

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I need help locating a rotary chisel similar to the “Terrier” bits that Graham Potter uses in his carving. Are there any places here in the states where I can buy one? I have a 1/4" die grinder, unfortunately the bits that I have been able to get dull extremely fast. I have a lot more work to do on this redwood, so any help would be appreciated.
 

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Brian Underwood

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I use one of those all the time on a die grinder, lately specifically for redwoods. I believe it was purchased from Dale Cochoy, but I can't find it on his website. Perhaps you can contact him with the link you posted here and he can point you in the right direction. http://pages.prodigy.net/dalecochoy/

Nice base to the redwood! What does the rest of it look like?
 

PaulH

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Doc, That redwood has such fantastic natural deadwood that I can't imagine where carving would improve it.
 

Alex DeRuiter

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Absolutely -- it's so gnarly! Are you thinking about carving that branch sprouting from the base?

Also, have you considered online retailers? Amazon, perhaps?
 

mcpesq817

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Contact Dale Cochoy - I bought one of those smaller terrier type bits (I think that's what it was called) from him at a show earlier this year. He has all types of bits for Dremel type machines and larger like die grinders.
 

docs_bonsai

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"Carving Help"

Thanks for the response and help…You’re right Paul I’m probably not going to do any more work on the base other than cleaning…The decayed wood and slugs in the nooks have been removed and I’m down to the hard wood…I need the tool to reduce the stump on the right to balance the two apexes…With a larger tool I can remove the bulk of material and my Dremel with a 1/8" bit finish... It would also come in handy for that olive stump you gave me…Thanks again everyone, I'll post more pictures of my progress...
 

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Alex DeRuiter

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What is this terrier bit, anyway? I tried searching on Google but didn't get any results beyond pictures of Terrier dogs. Is it different from that wire-brush-type attachment for rotary tools?

Also, I'm curious as to what version of the Dremel rotary tool I should get. I'm just starting out with carving and probably won't do anything too crazy or labor-intensive for a while, but I'd like to at least get some experience on my "test subject" trees. Is it wiser to get a corded one in order to avoid the issue of battery life, or a battery-powered one to avoid the hindrance of a cord?
 

Jessf

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chipping away is the one stop shop for wood carvers of all kinds. It's a Canadian store but has an online retail store as well. If you called them and told them what you intend on doing I'm sure they'd have a few of bits for you to choose from.

I'm fortunate enough to work 5 mins from this place and I've bought many carving tools from them over the years, great place.

http://www.chippingaway.com/

I'll be going there sometime this week looking for a terrier type bit for my own carvings, I'll let you know what I find.


Axxon, with the amount of amps you'll be drawing during these long carving sessions you'll want a corded model. A battery pack model might work for small projects, but so will a corded one.

I think all of the Dremels come with variable speeds, but if not, you'll want one that has this feature.
 

Alex DeRuiter

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Thank you for that, Jessf. That gives me a good idea of what to look for when I actually do invest in one.
 

rockm

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"I'm curious as to what version of the Dremel rotary tool I should get."

This depends largely on what you're working on. Any version of the dremel (preferably the 300 version with a variable speed--although it isn't absolutely necessary) rotary will work on smaller trees--like those with trunks up to two inches or so in diameter. Dremel sells a package of standard tungsten "burr" bits that are more than adequate for working smaller trees.

If you have larger trees that have significant areas of deadwood or with large trunks and branches that need some "interest" you can consider larger carving tools, like angle grinders or other devices that can move more wood.

You can find all kinds of carving bits at Dale Cochoy's site under "carving."
http://pages.prodigy.net/dalecochoy/
 

docs_bonsai

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"Carving Help"

Thanks for the responses...I thought Dale only built bonsai pots, I didn't know that his store sold carving tools...Talking to him as we speak!!
My next carving project...This olive is a sliver from a huge tree that was said to be almost 100 years old...Paul will give the exact age as soon as he sees this thread!! Counting on you buddy...
 

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Bill S

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Dales site seems to be at it's death knell, looks like At&T is not supporting his type site anymore, and the context lost soon, tried to email Dale via site and it came back as bad attempt. Not sure if there might be another site to try or not, but it looks like the wild things site is about history.

Anyone know how to get in touch to let him know.

Dale ususally has all the carving tools at the different shows, if you can make it to one of them.
 

Brian Van Fleet

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Came up when I tried: http://pages.prodigy.net/dalecochoy/

These tri-cut bits are very good: http://pages.prodigy.net/dalecochoy/tools/Tri-Cut1.jpg (image attached) especially the smaller ones. The largest one is heavy and a little scary spinning at 1600 RPM, but moves some serious wood.

The email address listed on his site is: dalecochoy at prodigy dot net

I'd also say that the Dremmel bits I've tried (with frustration) aren't intended for our type of carving, so before you blow through 15 bits at $3.00 each, it's easier to start with the right tool for the job.
 

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Jessf

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don't rule out hand tools as well. A good set of gouges and chisels can do wonders for removing large material and finer detail.
For example. I carved this fish scale design with fine hand tools. The dremel has a tendency to jump and skip, whereas hand tools can be as smooth as butter if you keep them razor sharp.



Swiss Made makes one of the nicest set of chisels and gouges.
 

PaulH

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Thanks for the responses...I thought Dale only built bonsai pots, I didn't know that his store sold carving tools...Talking to him as we speak!!
My next carving project...This olive is a sliver from a huge tree that was said to be almost 100 years old...Paul will give the exact age as soon as he sees this thread!! Counting on you buddy...
Okay. The olives came from a home that was built in the remains of an olive orchard at least 100 years old in Carmichael, CA. The trees had already been cut to stumps 1' to 2' high. this one was about 6' in diameter. We used chainsaws and wedges to split off chunks and pulled them out with a come - along.

This one is 1/6 of the tree. It weighed about 400 lbs. so I have since split into 2 200 lb. trees.



This one is 1/4 of a tree that had already been pushed out with a tractor and had been sitting upside down with roots in the air for several months! I think olives could survive anything.

 

docs_bonsai

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"Pauls Olive Stumps"

Way to go buddy, nice pick's...Whats that on your chin? :)
 
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