Catlin Elm

daveskib

Sapling
Messages
36
Reaction score
0
Location
Bear, Delaware
USDA Zone
7
I have 2 Chinese Elm Catlin variety and want to put them in a cool garage for the winter. The problem is they don't seem to be losing their leaves. Can i store them with the leaves on and have them fall on their own? Temps here around high 40s low 50s during the day and low 30s at night. I have read that you don't want to leave them out too long and have the fleshy roots freeze and kill the tree.

Sincerely,
Dave
 

Martin Sweeney

Chumono
Messages
688
Reaction score
161
Location
Waxhaw, NC
USDA Zone
8a
Daveskib,

My chinese elms still have green leaves too, although I am in Charlotte, NC area. Most of the leaves, though green, are dormant, but haven't fallen off yet. I have started mulching my trees into their outdoor wintering bed, some with leaves still on. We haven't had much more than a couple of light frosts here. Have you had any hard frosts or freezes yet in Delaware? If so, I would think that the leaves are pretty much dormant, just not smart enough to fall off.

I would prefer that the trees have no leaves on them before placing them in winter storage to remove the possibility of overwintering fugus and stuff, but I want to protect the roots more than I worry about the remaining leaves. I would assume that the same would hold true for you, even in the enclosed area of the unheated garage.

I do not think that lack of light on the existing leaves will cause any problems to your trees, if that is your concern.

Regards,
Martin
 

rockm

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
9,684
Reaction score
12,403
Location
Fairfax Va.
USDA Zone
7
If the leaves on your catlin are still green and show no signs of falling off, your tree is not dormant. Placing a non-dormant deciduous tree in the dark will kill it, or force unhealthy sappy growth which will weaken the tree.

Catlins can hang onto leaves in the winter, but those leaves generally look olive drab in color and fall off when brushed. If that's the case, garage storage is fine, although in Charlotte, such storage might induce early bud break.

In both Delaware and N.C., I'd look for a mulched sheltered space in the garden out of the wind to put the tree. Catlin is a little less cold hardy than the main Chinese Elm species and can require more protection.
 

wvbonsai

Sapling
Messages
46
Reaction score
0
Location
Huntington, WV
USDA Zone
7
According to Brent walston in his article Over Wintering Bonsai,
No winter protection is needed for temperate climate woody plants until the temperature falls below 15F (-10C).

His statement is based on study and experience in over 30 years of horticulture. Not to mention the fact that more exposure to cold temperatures above 15 degrees during the early phases of dormancy will greatly increase the specimens cold hardiness. I feel that both of your winter protection timing is premature. Assure you that this statement is made only with the best intentions for your trees. I learned this the hard way last year. I packed my Chinese elms away far too early and while still partially innleaf. These trees did not experience any chilling temps below 32F and suffered in their poor cold hardiness. Both of these Elms I had been training for several years died. I'm I'm Huntington wv. Our lowest temp so far has been 28F. The only thing I have done is prepare the winter quarters under my benches and partially heel in azaleas and Jwp and one Chinese Elm. I won't mulch them over until temps are constantly below 32F. Just a note from personal and Mr. Walston's highly credible experience. do as you wish but hopefully everything goes swimmingly for you!
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom