Cautionary Tale for Beginners - Not all nice looking pots are good

BrianBay9

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I bought a tree last year that came in this round pot. Nice looking pot. A bit heavy but a good feel.

pot 1.jpg


Had a chop. Somebody thought it was worth $70 at some point.

pot 2.jpg


But look at the drain hole placement. The bottom is slightly convex, and instead of placing the drains at the lowest point, they are on the convex slope. This pot holds at least a half inch of water around the edge.

pot 3.jpg
 

BrianBay9

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I made this purchase for the tree, not the pot. But now I have a pot that is totally worthless for my purposes. I can't imagine what I would put back in it. Any suggestions other than target practice?
 

Wires_Guy_wires

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Get some caulk in there, raise the bottom edges so that the holes are now at the actual bottom. Nobody will notice unless you get the tree out of it.
Since caulk is usually pretty flexible, it should withstand freezing and heating. Most caulks use acetic acid as a solvent, so after drying there's minimal damage to the tree. Even if it comes off, it will fill a space that roots can't grow into, so the standing water shouldn't be an issue.
 

BrianBay9

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Drilling is certainly an option. Filling the lowest areas with chalk or something else is a creative suggestion too.
 

Deep Sea Diver

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Easy job. Looks like a job for a 3/8 or 1/2” or more diamond hole cutter.

Keep the cutter wet the whole time while cutting. block The backside of the cut and go slow at the end. I’ve drilled over 20 pots in the last year.

good luck.

DSD sends
 

sorce

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Where's the dead tree?

I wouldn't worry about it at all.

With soil its not that bad. With wires drawing water out it's less bad. With the tree using the water, it only leaves winter, when it's froze it's froze.

Sorce
 

BrianBay9

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Where's the dead tree?

I wouldn't worry about it at all.

With soil its not that bad. With wires drawing water out it's less bad. With the tree using the water, it only leaves winter, when it's froze it's froze.

Sorce

You're right, the tree was alive. The soil was very soggy though.
 

Tums

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Get some caulk in there, raise the bottom edges so that the holes are now at the actual bottom. Nobody will notice unless you get the tree out of it.
Since caulk is usually pretty flexible, it should withstand freezing and heating. Most caulks use acetic acid as a solvent, so after drying there's minimal damage to the tree. Even if it comes off, it will fill a space that roots can't grow into, so the standing water shouldn't be an issue.
Dumb question, do you just mean the regular silicone caulk that you can get in tubes at the big box stores?
 

BrianBay9

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While it's certainly true that I could successfully grow a tree in this pot by being a bit more careful managing water, if shopping for a pot I would never buy one that did not fully drain. In fact, when discussing pots with beginners I specifically advise to check for a level bottom that fully drains. This was my primary point in posting this thread.
 

penumbra

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I think I would not bother with any pre-treatment of the pot unless the plant intended is very sensitive to over watering.
I love the caulking idea as it doesn't change the pot and is the cheapest and fasting method.
I have drilled dozens of pots and learned long ago, do not use a carbide bit unless it is a soft terra cotta like a regular flower pot. If you don't crack the pot you will still end of with a jagged hole. If you are drilling a high fire pot or porcelain with a carbide bit you may destroy the pot and you will definitely destroy the bit. If you care about the way a drilled hole looks, you will use a diamond hole-saw.
 

bonhe

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I bought a tree last year that came in this round pot. Nice looking pot. A bit heavy but a good feel.

View attachment 416339


Had a chop. Somebody thought it was worth $70 at some point.

View attachment 416340


But look at the drain hole placement. The bottom is slightly convex, and instead of placing the drains at the lowest point, they are on the convex slope. This pot holds at least a half inch of water around the edge.

View attachment 416341
Hahaha. I actually like this kind of pot for some of trees such as tamarix, wisteria . I have to place these trees in the deep water reservoir in the summer. They love water.
Thụ Thoại
 

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