Chamaecyparis obtusa / Hinoki cypress "Sekka Miyabi"

Messages
128
Reaction score
205
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
8B
A month ago I posted this topic with a Youtube video of a rare Japanese Cypress.

It should be a cultivar of Sekka Hinoki but it is different from the 'standard" Sekka Hinoki like we know.

On my search for more info about Sekka Hinoki and the possible different cultivars I probably found the cultivar mentioned in the Youtube video.

On the website fromjapan-kt.com I found a Chamaecyparis obtusa / Hinoki cypress "Sekka Miyabi".

Has anybody ever seen this cultivar of Sekka Hinoki?


20210704_c9c561.jpg


20210704_d2d93f.jpg


20210704_b9e4dc.jpg


20210704_d73b0b.jpg


20210704_73d60f.jpg


20210704_41eddf.jpg
 

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,878
Reaction score
9,045
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
'Miyabi' probably translates as 'Fatboy' :rolleyes:
 

Cofga

Omono
Messages
1,441
Reaction score
1,488
Location
Western NC
USDA Zone
7a
Sekkas are pretty new to this country and I have never heard of that var. I remember asking a local dealer in rare dwarf conifers about them several years ago and he had never heard of them. However over the weekend I scored 10 rooted cuttings at our club sale so they are starting to make inroads. Your var may just be lagging behind a few years getting introduced here. It will be interesting to see what you do with it.
 
Messages
128
Reaction score
205
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
8B
Thanks for the replies so far.

It seems that there is not that much info about Sekka Hinoki and it's cultivars (info which I can read as I can't read Japanese).
I've watched about every Youtube video about Sekka Hinoki and I really want to start working on these the coming years.

Last year I bought a few Chirimen (they look are very similar to Sekka) because I couldn't find any "real" Sekka at that moment.
A few months ago I was able to buy a few Sekka cuttings from a bonsai seller in Italy.

It looks like the Miyabi cultivar has a little bit more needle like foliage.
If I find more info about this cultivar I will post it in this topic.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
22,325
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
8a
I did a search for the cultivar, and could only find a couple of mentions on Japanese e-commerce sites. I only saw a single other tree (other than the OP's):

binc_rare_miyabi_sekka_hinoki__1614119766_5ddca953_progressive.jpg

It doesn't look (to me) anything like a hinoki cypress. More like a dwarf cryptomeria. I don't see any foliage on either tree that isn't needle. Hinoki cypresses don't have needle growth. Maybe they are referring to Cryptomeria japonica 'Sekkan'? I get a little suspicious when the only mention I can find of a 'rare' cultivar is on e-commerce sites... and you don't find it at a single nursery.

A month ago I posted this topic with a Youtube video of a rare Japanese Cypress.

In your video did they call the tree a "Japanese cypress"? (ie cryptomeria?) Or did they call it a Hinoki cypress?
 
Last edited:
Messages
128
Reaction score
205
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
8B
The video popped up searching for Sekka Hinoki and in the first few seconds of the video you see a Sekka Hinoki.
But after those few seconds you see another tree and that is probably a (rare) Japanese cypress and not a Sekka Hinoki.
I can't read the Japanese title and text of the video and that's why I asked about this tree on this forum (in my first topic about the video).

The growing habits look a bit like Sekka Hinoki does but the needle like voilage is completly different

I watched the video again and there are some English subtitles during the video and it says:
"I bought this Japanes Cypress at the Syuga exhibition last week"

So I think you are right about this species, it looks more like some kind of Cryptomeria than it looks like some kind of Hinoki.

But nevertheless why would a Cryptomeria variety be called Sekka Hinoki Miyabi on an e-commerce site? :rolleyes:
 

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,878
Reaction score
9,045
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
I have a couple of these. One is very small, maybe 6" and looks like it's growing, but only barely and I've had it for I'm guessing 5 years. I bought it at a Hosta growers conclave. The other one is in my landscape for maybe 3 years. It was a foot then and now is maybe 24" tall. I put it in the yard as an oddity, or actually a regret that I paid for it and it doesn't have any chance of becoming something because it has all the bad habits of Chamaecyparis and none of the good (whatever that is). I think I Thought I'd give it a chance to grow so I could do something with it. Alas and alack...

Sekka front 072221.JPG
It may not be the dumbest thing I've ever bought, but must be a close second.
 
Last edited:

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
22,325
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
8a
I have a couple of these. One is very small, maybe 6" and looks like it's growing, but only barely and I've had it for I'm guessing 5 years. I bought it at a Hosta growers conclave. The other one is in my landscape for maybe 3 years. It was a foot then and now is maybe 24" tall. I put it in the yard as an oddity, or actually a regret that I paid for it and it doesn't have any chance of becoming something because it has all the bad habits of Chamaecyparis and none of the good (whatever that is). I think I Thought I'd give it a chance to grow so I could do something with it. Alas and alack...
Can you post a closeup of the foliage? Your tree and the OP's do not look the same(?)
 
Messages
128
Reaction score
205
Location
Netherlands
USDA Zone
8B
The tree in the picture of Forsoothe! looks like a regular Sekka Hinoki to me.
 

Bonsai Nut

Nuttier than your average Nut
Messages
10,884
Reaction score
22,325
Location
Charlotte area, North Carolina
USDA Zone
8a
But nevertheless why would a Cryptomeria variety be called Sekka Hinoki Miyabi on an e-commerce site? :rolleyes:

I have seen tons of mistakes in labeling over the years - particularly if foreign languages and translations are involved. It would be an easy enough thing for someone to confuse "Japanese cypress" with "Hinoki cypress from Japan".

Check out this video of Bjorn working on a Sekka Hinoki. The tree he is working on, and the original tree in this post, have nothing in common.

 

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,878
Reaction score
9,045
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
I watched but didn't listen to the video. I wonder how many years it will be until we have have stock like that available here?
 

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,878
Reaction score
9,045
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
Actually, my other one is probably an Elm. Close, but no cigar?
 

Leo in N E Illinois

The Professor
Messages
10,263
Reaction score
20,327
Location
on the IL-WI border, a mile from ''da Lake''
USDA Zone
5b
Hinoki False Cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa - has a juvenile form of foliage, that we seldom see, because normally seedlings revert to adult foliage fairly rapidly, within a couple years of sprouting from seed. The juvenile foliage does look like the photos in post #1, the OP's photos. By the way, juvenile foliage of Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa) does look a lot like the foliage of a Cryptomeria and or a soft version of needle juniper foliage. It is often quite difficult to tell seedlings of Chamaecyparis, Cryptomeria and Juniper apart. As young seedlings they all look alike.

There are a small handful of Hinoki cultivars that retain juvenile foliage, for example Chamaecyparis obtusa 'Ericoides' aand C. obtusa 'Chabo Yoderi'

attached is a photo of foliage of 'Chabo Yoderi'

IMG_20210722_134931142_HDR.jpg
 

Cofga

Omono
Messages
1,441
Reaction score
1,488
Location
Western NC
USDA Zone
7a
I watched but didn't listen to the video. I wonder how many years it will be until we have have stock like that available here?
You should have listened. He got it from Brussel’s so they are readily available now from them, and he said that it is a fast grower. I hope so as I now have 11 rooted cuttings to play with. I love Hinoki and find them easy to grow. I have 2 in pots and at least a dozen in the yard. Bjorn’s video is full of tips on pruning and developing them.
 

Lutonian

Chumono
Messages
531
Reaction score
1,236
Location
Luton, East Anglia, England, Great Britain
USDA Zone
9a
Sekka hinoki and sekka hinoki next to gracilis nana hinoki
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20210727_202111.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202111.jpg
    136.9 KB · Views: 29
  • IMG_20210727_202156.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202156.jpg
    170.2 KB · Views: 27
  • IMG_20210727_202302.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202302.jpg
    175 KB · Views: 28

Lutonian

Chumono
Messages
531
Reaction score
1,236
Location
Luton, East Anglia, England, Great Britain
USDA Zone
9a
cryptomeria japonica compressa and cryptomeria japonica compressa next to seed grown cryptomeria japonica
 

Attachments

  • IMG_20210727_202212.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202212.jpg
    145.6 KB · Views: 29
  • IMG_20210727_202220.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202220.jpg
    171.1 KB · Views: 18
  • IMG_20210727_202243.jpg
    IMG_20210727_202243.jpg
    184.5 KB · Views: 21

Forsoothe!

Imperial Masterpiece
Messages
6,878
Reaction score
9,045
Location
Michigan
USDA Zone
6b
Stumbling around today I found some goodies...
ToP & CoBB 080221 as new.JPG
I might even get stupider. I'm kinda thinking of making a miniature forest made with a few more T.o. P Expensive, but then it's late in my career and this may be my only possibility for one. The BB will be a loner shohin.
 

Similar threads

Top Bottom