Chickasaw Plum

RyanFrye

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Hello,

For my first post I thought I would share a photo of my plum coming into bloom. It is sort of a bunjin with low weeping branches. This may change as it continues to ramify and I get a clearer image of where I would like the design to go. I purchased it as nursery material and it has been in bonsai training for a year now. It's a native of Florida, "prunus angustifolia".

My plans are to reduce the root ball in a few short weeks after flowering and continue to develop the ramification.

What do you all think?

(Sorry about the sideways photo. I can't seem to get the rotate to stay once I upload it)
 

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RyanFrye

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Thanks for the comment boondock.

I love Chickasaws. For people in Florida it is really the best option for prunus species bonsai. It's leaves are smaller than most prunus as well, ranging from 1" - 2" . The bark corks up with age and it looks great in all seasons.

I found this link that might help you in researching them: http://www.floridata.com/ref/P/prun_ang.cfm


This is the pot that I'm thinking of putting it in next spring.
 

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RyanFrye

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I figured out how to post the tree right - side up. Here it is:
 

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Jay Wilson

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Ryan,
This is a pretty image. Be sure to update when you get it in its pot.
I have always liked Chickasaw plum and would love to have one or two sitting on my benches.
By the way, where are you located?
 

davetree

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I like your plum tree. It is a very nice bunjin. The pot is good for next year, but I think something a bit thinner and less heavy would complement the tree nicely. Thanks for showing us a tree.
 

RyanFrye

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Davetree and Jay,

Thank you for your comments.

Davetree - Do you have any photos of pots that you think would work? I would be very interested in your ideas.

Jay - I am located in Sanford, Florida. It's northeast of Orlando. As far as finding Chickasaw plums for sale, I have only found them at smaller "out of the way" type nurserys. However, if you want a seedling you can buy them off of ebay. I'll find the seller again if you are interested.
 

RyanFrye

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I took another photo of the tree this morning. It has more blooms.
 

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davetree

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Dale Cochoy has very nice pots for a tree like that, so does bunjinent on this site. You need a pot that is about as thick as the diameter of the trunk. The pot you have in mind is too deep, it will drown the tree visually. You want this tree to appear as if it is almost floating, so you need a thin round, unobtrusive pot. I am a computer idiot and cannot link pictures for some reason. I'll keep trying.
 

davetree

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I think you could carefully wire a little movement into the straight sections of the tree to improve the appearance. Probably want to wrap it with raffia. Also don't be too quick to put it into its final pot. As I said, the pot you have is ok for this year. You want to reduce that rootball gradually.
 

RyanFrye

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[...] don't be too quick to put it into its final pot. As I said, the pot you have is ok for this year. You want to reduce that rootball gradually.
I have never dealt with root pruning on prunus bonsai. I was planning on reducing it by half of the nursery can that it is in now this year and then putting it in the pot shown above next spring, which would be reducing it by half again. Do you think I could safely prune enough this year to put it into the pot I chose? If so, is my thinking right when I said I would do it after flowering? (I looked at it this morning and the leaf buds are already swelling)
 

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Hi Ryan, nice to see you around. Love the plum. As a Floridian I think these could make great bonsai. I have some on my property in Ocala and love to see them this time of year in bloom. Refreshing.
 

RyanFrye

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Hi Ryan, nice to see you around. Love the plum. As a Floridian I think these could make great bonsai. I have some on my property in Ocala and love to see them this time of year in bloom. Refreshing.
Hi Graydon,

It's good to see you round too! It's been a while.

Are you going to collect any of the ones in Ocala? I'll help!:D

Ryan
 

Graydon

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Hi Graydon,

It's good to see you round too! It's been a while.

Are you going to collect any of the ones in Ocala? I'll help!:D

Ryan
Doubt I will have time this year as the opportunity of timing is now nearly gone. I would be happy to have a crawl around up there with you when I slow down later this summer. Do some looking and tagging.
 

RyanFrye

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Doubt I will have time this year as the opportunity of timing is now nearly gone. I would be happy to have a crawl around up there with you when I slow down later this summer. Do some looking and tagging.
Sounds good! Shoot me a pm whenever you're ready.:D
 

Graydon

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That goes without saying. I actually drive thru your area on my way up there. Would be rude not to stop by and enjoy a glass of iced tea and a chance to see your trees up close again!
 

RyanFrye

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Here it is, a front and back shot!

The leaves started pushing so I figured now would be the time to do the root work. My original plan was to reduce it by only half and put it back in the black nursery can. But, after investigating the root ball I noticed that it was full of feeder roots! There weren't any large tap roots at all. I'm geussing that it was a collected tree from the wild.

It was also planted in about 60% perlite. While the stark white color of perlite is not very attractive it's probably what allowed all those nice feeder roots to form. I decided to go for it and remove more of the root ball than I originally planned so that it would fit in the pot I got for it. I didn't remove the original soil. I plan on doing that next repot.

Anyone know If I should remove the flowers now that I have repotted? Or does it even make a difference?
 

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Jay Wilson

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Looks good Ryan. Like the mosswork.
I have no idea about removing the flowers....if it shows signs of stress, I probably would, but if it acts like nothing has happened to it I would let them go and enjoy them. I'd remove any fruit that forms though.

Thanks for sharing.
 

pjkatich

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Ryan,

This is a very good looking tree.

I have been messing with Chickasaw plums for a number of years and have found them to be very hard to grow in shallow containers. The pot you have selected is about as shallow as I would go and is not a bad choice.

Enjoy the flowers, they do not last very long. However, as Jay said, remove any fruit that starts to develop as quickly as possible. The tree is stressed at this point and you do not want lose it.

The major draw back to this species is they are borer magnets. Stressed trees seem to attract them like flies to horse manure. So, keep a close eye out for them. They will destroy a tree in a very short time if you don't watch for them. The borers start to show up around the end of March and last all through the summer in my little corner of the state.

Good luck,
Paul
 
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