Chinese Cork Elm progression and Calcium deposit help.

RileyJFDB13

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Happy friday all!!

Here are some progression photos from this year alone of the developments of my cork bark Chinese Elm. I also bring a question to the table, I live in Southern California which means my water quality is terrible and I get relatively little rain. I do my best not to touch the bark when watering my trees but sometimes there's nothing that you can do. With that being said I have hard water deposits on my bark is there any solution to this issue and how can I get it off possibly?

Also excuse the pot that it's currently in, but I'll take shape recommendations for this tree for future pots if anybody has any. Thanks again guys!

January 14, 2017
IMG_2530.JPG
March 9, 2017IMG_2978.JPG
June 21, 2017IMG_3964.JPG
Today, July 28, 2017IMG_4248.JPG
 

hemmy

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Yikes! At that rate the tree will be completely buried by spring! Maybe spraying a vinegar solution with some light brushing on the trunk and start acidifying your water.

If your water is that bad, is the tree getting chlorotic? I couldn't really tell from the last pic.

I have moderately alkaline water, some of my cork elms started to get discolored leaves. I thought elms were tougher than that. I began using an acidic fertlizer and started acidifying the water with vinegar.
 

StoneCloud

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You can get a water filter for your outdoor hose only or even get a filtration system for your whole house. It will take a little time but by using less hard water, the deposits will eventually go away.

You can also purchase distilled water and use that to water the tree. I would suggest collecting rainwater but if you are in a drier climate probably not feasible.
 

hemmy

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Out here in the desert, it has to be rain tanks not barrels. But in a normal rain year (15-20") with a decent sized house and garage, you should be able to fill several large tanks. But that's a real investment. For one tree, you can probably buy $1 gallons of water and it doesn't have to be distilled. I've pampered some orchids with Crystal Geyser bottles in the Sierras, there water report is online.
 

bleumeon

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Vinegar and a toothbrush will clean off deposits.

I use a hose filter for my trees.

It's the gardensafe one on Amazon. Ive used it for the past 2 growing seasons and it does the job well.

I live in socal as well.
 

hemmy

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Vinegar and a toothbrush will clean off deposits.

I use a hose filter for my trees.

It's the gardensafe one on Amazon. Ive used it for the past 2 growing seasons and it does the job well.

I live in socal as well.
Hose filter for hardness? The only one I saw was a chlorine filter.
 

bleumeon

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Hose filter for hardness? The only one I saw was a chlorine filter.
This is the one I used.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00G2586NK/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1501305472&sr=8-3&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=water+hose+filter&dpPl=1&dpID=41ThAHkxYzL&ref=plSrch

It's advertised for chlorine but it does seem to reduce some hard water deposits on my trees. My deciduous seem to like it at least.

If you have really bad hard water though you need a RO system or rain water.
 

RileyJFDB13

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I will look into this thanks for all the replies! Any advice on a pot?
 

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