Chinese elm didn't lose it's leaves

Tibar96

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My chinese elm is in full leaf although it is outside and the temperatures dropped to -10 C for a week now. The tree dropped about 5-10% of the leaves at the start of the winter but the rest are green and look healthy. Should I defoliate the tree prior to spring or let it do it's thing?

Thank you in advance!
 

Tibar96

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Don't defoliate - it knows how and when to do that itself.

-10C is severe for an imported Chinese elm - I would have protected it if it was still fully in Ieaf
I won't defoliate then! Thank you!
I built a small greenhouse for the 5-6 trees i have. I Insulated the bottom of the greenhouse and i filled the spaces between the pots with insulation, i hope the trees were given enough protection. The temperatures here in Romania started to rise so the cool weather is over.
I hope i did a good job protecting them. What do you think?
 

Shibui

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It is common for Chinese elms to hold leaves all winter in warmer areas. In some places they never actually go dormant but that does not seem to hurt them. There is no need to defoliate. The old leaves will drop as the new shoots grow in spring.
At -10C I would expect Chinese elms to drop leaves. Mine usually drop leaves when temps get below freezing. Maybe it will take a couple of seasons to get used to your climate.
 

jeremy_norbury

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I won't defoliate then! Thank you!
I built a small greenhouse for the 5-6 trees i have. I Insulated the bottom of the greenhouse and i filled the spaces between the pots with insulation, i hope the trees were given enough protection. The temperatures here in Romania started to rise so the cool weather is over.
I hope i did a good job protecting them. What do you think?
If they didn't immediately deteriorate and look generally unhealthy,you're probably fine.

Imported Chinese elms are the most vulnerable at the point they actually come out of dormancy. Yours never went into it - also a dangerous time.
 

Tibar96

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If they didn't immediately deteriorate and look generally unhealthy,you're probably fine.

Imported Chinese elms are the most vulnerable at the point they actually come out of dormancy. Yours never went into it - also a dangerous time.
I believe it has something to do with me buying the tree last winter and keeping it indoors until spring...i am curious to see what happens next
 

leatherback

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I am not too concerned to be honest. Chinese elms in general are pretty hardy. If it had a normal summer-into-fall transition, it would have responded to ever lower temperatures.

My chinese elm has not dropped its leaves either so far. But.. winter has been a joke with the coldest night so far around -6. I think about 15 frozen mornings this winter. Mind gets taken out of the sun and wind put in a sheltered corner of the garden if real winter is expected. (This year I have left everything in place)
 

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