Chinese elm pre bonsai?

19Mateo83

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I went to a local nursery today that has a tiny mallsai section. They had these labeled as “Chinese elm starter plants $11.99” question #1 Are these indeed Chinese elm? It has elm looking leaves that are tiny. The reason I ask is they have others in there labeled the same and they have definitely do not elm looking leaves.
Question #2 does this look like something worth messing with/decent starter material? They are in nursery soil at the moment and they have 3 in stock very similar to this one.
 

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Deep Sea Diver

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Chinese elm prebonsai are like potato chips, you can’t take just one of them!

Seriously, look for the shortest trunk section if there is such a thing there. Alternatively check the trunk flexibility as you’ll be having fun soon bending the little guy... although they should all flex pretty well that size. 😎

We actually did the Ebihara method on a couple Chinese Elm nebari‘s last year cut them back like the dickens too… it’s still ticking away. Be aware, Chinese elms do have fleshy roots.

Best
DSD sends
 

Shibui

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Looks like Chinese elm.
There are a range of Chinese elm varieties. Some have smaller leaves, some have larger leaves, some have corky bark, some have tiny leaves.
The growth habit - long, straight new shoots and smallish leaves - of this one looks like the one I call 'Catlin'. Seedlings can also have smaller leaves sometimes so could also be a seed grown Chinese elm.
Catlin is very slow to thicken and slow to develop ramification as response to pruning is less vigorous than other types. Catlin is the least deciduous of all the Chinese elm vars I grow which probably also tallies as the pic appears to show some old leaves still on the tree.
I have several I've spent many years developing small and shohin sized trees because of the smaller leaf size.
Get one if you wish but be prepared for frustration with slow development, lack of taper and ramification.
 
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