Chinese Elm progression

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Thread where I will update on my Chinese elms.
Meet Ugly. He was free and came with some sort of leaf issue. I removed most leaves, tried to improve on the ugly cut, did a bit of root work, now he is going back outside
 

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Also this guy, had to repot and now he is growing again. Unfortunately it is getting that same leaf issue, mostly on new leaves
 

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Pics didn’t all attach
 

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A couple that are pretty similar
 

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PA_Penjing

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I've heard about this leaf spotting issue with elm trees but have not experienced it myself. From what I read it can be kind of a bitch to get rid of. I'd be really curious to see what anyone recommends who has dealt with this issue and come out the other side. I haven't collected any American elms because I'm afraid to introduce this fungus to my parvifolia
 
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Two that have small leaves
 

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Another one that is not super fit for bonsai but I like it
Had to prune a bit this morning due to some leaves showing that same problem
 

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I've heard about this leaf spotting issue with elm trees but have not experienced it myself. From what I read it can be kind of a bitch to get rid of. I'd be really curious to see what anyone recommends who has dealt with this issue and come out the other side. I haven't collected any American elms because I'm afraid to introduce this fungus to my parvifolia
Yes it’s been a pain. I thought I got it all taken care of, then I saw it on one tree then another... it seems to contaminate to other elms close by, but only elms
 

PA_Penjing

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Yes it’s been a pain. I thought I got it all taken care of, then I saw it on one tree then another... it seems to contaminate to other elms close by, but only elms
Are you sterilizing your shears between each cut? I don't know anything about this particular fungus but others I'm familiar with can be introduced to other plants through the wounds created by a contaminated blade
 
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Sun seems to have taken care of the propagation. I removed all bad leaves, aggressively, then everybody out day and night
Now all seems good and growing
 
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All these guys are outside day and night
This morning I found a small amount of spider webs within and between trees
After work I can take a closer look
 
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Guys, could you use your help on these leaves. I thought I was done with it, but no
It is on all trees, regardless of what soil it is in, and after days on nice sunshine
Let me know your thoughts
 

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Forsoothe!

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I think fooling around with sterilizing shears is a lot like spraying room freshener in a toilet so you can do sterile procedures there. Regardless of where it came from, it's in the environment now: leaves, litter, soil, non-symptomatic neighbors, ad infinitum and you need a systemic to protect the plant, probably continuing long term. Hort oils on leaves in strong sunlight is a problem, too, so nothing is easy or foolproof, but some treatments are better than others. There is no correlation between ~Green~ people and green plants.
 

Leo in N E Illinois

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I think fooling around with sterilizing shears is a lot like spraying room freshener in a toilet so you can do sterile procedures there. Regardless of where it came from, it's in the environment now: leaves, litter, soil, non-symptomatic neighbors, ad infinitum and you need a systemic to protect the plant, probably continuing long term. Hort oils on leaves in strong sunlight is a problem, too, so nothing is easy or foolproof, but some treatments are better than others. There is no correlation between ~Green~ people and green plants.

I'm sorry, I have to disagree with you. It is a good practice to sterilize cutting tools every time one switches from one tree to the next. 70% isopropyl alcohol works fine, similar assay ethanol or methanol will be equally effective to wipe down tools.

The reason is not necessarily to control just fungus and or bacteria. This will also control plant virus. Plant virus are often asymptomatic, or with few symptoms. Then when the plant is stressed the symptoms become obvious. A cultivar that in the past was known to be vigorous, and then seems to fail to thrive often has picked up a plant virus. Cutting tools are the number one vector for plant viruses.

Viruses are difficult to detect without using serum techniques. In every species of plant that has been assayed for virus, one or more species of virus have been found. Routinely wiping tools down after each tree is one effective method to stop the spread of virus.

About "dutch elm disease", the disease is lethal in American elms. The disease originated in China, the Netherlands had nothing to do with it beyond being where it was first noticed. Elms native to China are generally immune to "Dutch elm disease". One can raise American elms and Chinese elms together, and while the American elm will be susceptible to Dutch elm, the Chinese elm will be immune.

The Dutch elm disease is spread by a bark beetle. The bark beetle responsible tends to prefer to feed in trees over 20 feet tall. Bonsai size American elms tend to be ignored by the bark beetles that carry the disease. So we often can keep an American elm for many, many years as bonsai with no problems with dutch elm disease. And if a bonsai elm does get the disease, there are one or two systemic fungicides that will work against it. It is possible to treat a tree in a pot, should that become necessary.

So yes, wipe down your tools, because the plant viruses are usually asymptomatic. Wiping down your tools will also slow spreading other diseases around. I keep paper towels and a bottle of isopropyl along with my bonsai tools, and wipe once I finish with a tree. It is a "good hygiene" practice.
 

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