Chuhin JBP, progression

james

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I posted this Chuhin JBP 2 year’s ago, and again last week. Reviewing the progression prompted me to believe posting images across this time period would be of interest.

The first image at time of purchase, 11/2014. The last image, last week, 2/2018.

AD2738A8-9DD7-4F0D-A37F-D561B3E88568.jpeg3A03F02C-E452-4DAC-B268-A92F34C5C80F.jpegB30628FC-47E3-42DE-8050-F73B3AE73F78.jpeg7112DF3A-3331-48D1-82E4-E6D713E3359E.jpegC4840988-8A59-447D-A242-6D57B43D8E42.jpegC4E158AA-3D72-4F68-9082-2A67F5DB0F6A.jpeg
 

LanceMac10

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That lowest branch has got budding along it's entire length, even tight in close to the trunk. Grafts?
Fine tree.
 

ysrgrathe

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Wow, very impressive. Great tree!
 

james

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I would estimate tree to be 25-30 yrs old. Field grown. Chopped and potted at about 25 years.
Yes, there are needles in close on lower branches. No grafts. I was taught while building branches to keep some needles, don't decandle and strip ALL needles. Needle buds form. It sounded unlikely at the time, but thats exactly what happened.
 

LanceMac10

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My experience has been the same, I had to figure it out myself. Nice job.:cool:
 

augustine

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James,

Beautiful pine, could you please expound on your info on building branches. Thank you
 

james

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Augustine,

This tree was developed under the teaching of Boon, my teacher in the Bay Area. I wanted to "build", or finish a pine under his direction in a reasonable time frame. I brought this to his attention, and he directed me to several trees for sale. He suggested I could make a finished tree from my favorite in 5 years. I didn't quite believe him, because it looked quite rough. He suggested the trunk was there, with the needed taper, and had usable branches in reasonable position.

So we started from what you see in the first picture. I was instructed to clean up the first trunk chop, and set the first several branches. I was told not to remove too many needles on these branches. We candle cut each season, began setting upper branches, let a sacrifice run at the top to thicken the last segment of trunk. The branches back budded relatively easily (because they were young, and still had needles), which contributed to filling out the pads. The last sacrifice branch was cut in the second to last picture, and all branches wired. Needles plucked to balance strength, and tree let to grow out. There was a season between the 5th and 6th pictures that the tree grew well, density increased with candle cutting and tree was ready for last styling. With balancing growth and candle cutting, needle size came down considerably and density grew to what you see in last picture. It all went faster and better than I would have anticipated.

What I learned from this exercise, is developing the branches is relatively fast. The time invested in this tree was 20 plus years on trunk and nebari, that was the time consumptive part. Branches come last.
 

Adair M

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Augustine,

This tree was developed under the teaching of Boon, my teacher in the Bay Area. I wanted to "build", or finish a pine under his direction in a reasonable time frame. I brought this to his attention, and he directed me to several trees for sale. He suggested I could make a finished tree from my favorite in 5 years. I didn't quite believe him, because it looked quite rough. He suggested the trunk was there, with the needed taper, and had usable branches in reasonable position.

So we started from what you see in the first picture. I was instructed to clean up the first trunk chop, and set the first several branches. I was told not to remove too many needles on these branches. We candle cut each season, began setting upper branches, let a sacrifice run at the top to thicken the last segment of trunk. The branches back budded relatively easily (because they were young, and still had needles), which contributed to filling out the pads. The last sacrifice branch was cut in the second to last picture, and all branches wired. Needles plucked to balance strength, and tree let to grow out. There was a season between the 5th and 6th pictures that the tree grew well, density increased with candle cutting and tree was ready for last styling. With balancing growth and candle cutting, needle size came down considerably and density grew to what you see in last picture. It all went faster and better than I would have anticipated.

What I learned from this exercise, is developing the branches is relatively fast. The time invested in this tree was 20 plus years on trunk and nebari, that was the time consumptive part. Branches come last.
I’m doing the same thing with this one:

9E51AE08-DA42-444A-AC57-DB2556AD7945.jpeg
 
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