iHasaki

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Hello there good folk,

Some time ago I started looking for some bonsai starters/little tree’s. I didn’t think of connecting to others on forums. But when I found out, I liked the input on the different threats.

First off I started looking at the interwebs to find out if there are some qualifications for what a bonsai should look like and what those traits are. In a short time, I found lots of information. As many people as many opinions I guess.

Whit in the classification of the different styles, the Literati style got me the most. Perhaps the image off fighting to survive (and thrive) make some weird personification possible. I don’t know. I guess my conclusion is that I picked some trees that spoke to me. Won’t be the best picks possible but they work for me. Effectiveness requires quality as well as acceptation :) Also the fact that this style is more abstract means I can make some more mistakes without ruining the design fatally (I hope, let’s find out!).

In the meantime, I let the trees rest a little as I’m looking for some end-goal. I would like some input on the possibilities you guys see. This way I hope to learn a little faster and widen my view.

In the pictures you’ll see the trunk and branches I didn’t dare yet to clip off. Oh and I bought some bonsai pots. Root pruning further I will wait for what I’ll do with the foliage. I will post the sketches I made on some later moments! The following trees i think of making into this style: zanthoxylum piperitum, chinese elm, ligustrum.

My questions summarised:

1) Is it a good idea to begin with an end-goal or step by step (we'll see where we'll get) way of working on the tree
2) What kind of traits in my tree's define what is realistic and possible with them regarding this style or some I don't know off that is more fitting.
3) How would you start with this situation and what suggestions would you make?


Have a good one!
 

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sorce

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1) Is it a good idea to begin with an end-goal or step by step (we'll see where we'll get) way of working on the tree

It's an excellent Idea to have a 20 year plan.
If only to force your creativity and test your horticultural prediction amd execution skills.

You need these!

But plans...on living material... MUST remain completely flexible.

This is.."listening to the tree".

I had a grand plan for a Juniper...I was excited about it...
Then my dog whizzed on it and killed off most of my branches..
Now I found a new Plan that is WAY better than the old one...and I learned how far inside the "fence" I need to keep trees during the spring, when they are still on the ground.
So they cant get pissed on.

I have yet to not find a better path after a "mishap".
It's all a matter of perception.

Stay flexible.

What kind of traits in my tree's define what is realistic and possible with them regarding this style or some I don't know off that is more fitting

The most important thing to consider..due to the time this takes...
Is leaf size in comparison to the trunk you have.
You must be realistic.

That elm can get smaller amd the leaf size will be ok.
But don't expect to make an acorn a Bonsai in your lifetime.

All that flies out the window if you are growing a tree specifically for a winter silhouette.

While there are guidelines for other things...
Trees favored for certain forms...

Uh....see the current "stifle creativity" thread!


How would you start with this situation and what suggestions would you make?

You are here!

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
 

iHasaki

Seedling
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Thanks for the welcome! :cool:

I started with some soil and repotting in a mix of soil, akadama, bims, perlite and lava stones. Further I will procrastinate this year, let the interwebs give me some more ideas! I think the thing i became aware of already is that i need to find patience in this hobby. Lets start by that!
 

Lorax7

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It's an excellent Idea to have a 20 year plan.
If only to force your creativity and test your horticultural prediction amd execution skills.

You need these!

But plans...on living material... MUST remain completely flexible.

This is.."listening to the tree".

I had a grand plan for a Juniper...I was excited about it...
Then my dog whizzed on it and killed off most of my branches..
Now I found a new Plan that is WAY better than the old one...and I learned how far inside the "fence" I need to keep trees during the spring, when they are still on the ground.
So they cant get pissed on.

I have yet to not find a better path after a "mishap".
It's all a matter of perception.

Stay flexible.



The most important thing to consider..due to the time this takes...
Is leaf size in comparison to the trunk you have.
You must be realistic.

That elm can get smaller amd the leaf size will be ok.
But don't expect to make an acorn a Bonsai in your lifetime.

All that flies out the window if you are growing a tree specifically for a winter silhouette.

While there are guidelines for other things...
Trees favored for certain forms...

Uh....see the current "stifle creativity" thread!




You are here!

Welcome to Crazy!

Sorce
An alternate solution for the next time your dog pees on a tree (assuming that you see it when it happens): just grab the garden hose and give the tree a thorough watering with fresh water. Dilution is the solution to pollution. Maybe give the dog a little spray too for a bit of negative reinforcement.
 

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