coast redwood seed

Christa

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Do you need to stratify or soak these seeds before planting them? It's spring where I am now.
 

Bonsai Nut

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I would soak them for 24 hours as a matter of course before I placed them in your germination medium, but no, they do not need cold stratification (though you do want to keep the germination container in a cool place with only indirect lighting).

They have a pretty low germination rate - even when conditions are optimal.

And be careful in zone 9B - that is warm for them and outside of their normal range. People try to plant coast redwood all the time here in Southern California. They grow for about 20 years - just long enough to get big - and then die. I would personally consider giant sequoia as a heartier alternative if you don't get good results with coast redwood.
 

AlainK

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And be careful in zone 9B - that is warm for them and outside of their normal range. People try to plant coast redwood all the time here in Southern California. They grow for about 20 years - just long enough to get big - and then die.

I second that: I have five that I sowed three years ago. They're fast growing but although I live in USDA zone 8 (a few, actually fewer and fewer, days below 0° Celsius), they stop growing when it's too hot in the middle of the summer (30-35° C) and some of the branch tips get brown.

I suppose it's more because the air is dry and also because the temps don't go cool enough at night.
 

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I second that: I have five that I sowed three years ago. They're fast growing but although I live in USDA zone 8 (a few, actually fewer and fewer, days below 0° Celsius), they stop growing when it's too hot in the middle of the summer (30-35° C) and some of the branch tips get brown.

I suppose it's more because the air is dry and also because the temps don't go cool enough at night.

Yes. Unfortunately using USDA Zones (only) does not tell the whole story. Coast redwood occurs naturally close to the Pacific west coast, where the temperatures tend to be less variable, and humidity high, with a lot of marine layer, fog and mist. Even though the temperature ranges might be acceptable, the low humidity here in most of Southern California is often what appears to kill them - particularly once they get larger and project above the surrounding trees/foliage and bear the full brunt of periodic dry winds. They last longest in sheltered locations like the bottoms of protected valleys.

Consider as an alternative giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) which has shown to be much more tolerant of colder, warmer, and drier conditions than coast redwood. There are even several stands of them growing here in Southern California - including at least one that is reproducing naturally and spreading.

giant.jpg
 
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AlainK

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Coast redwood occurs naturally close to the Pacific west coast, where the temperatures tend to be less variable, and humidity high, with a lot of marine layer, fog and mist.

That's exactly what I meant, except that it sounds even more accurate from someone who lives in California, where the climate zones are even more different than in our small country here.

And-wow- the picture you posted is awesome: I grew up in "Massif Central", low mountains (max height 1683 metres, about one mile) in the center of France. Hot summers, cold winters with snow (there used to be snow), real seasons. Cows on the slopes: we would place bangers in the cows's dung when my kids were little, and come back with more freckles than when we left - stupid dad :rolleyes:
 

Redwood Ryan

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Here's what I always did when I sprouted Coast Redwood.

1. Soak seed in water for 24 hours
2. Place seeds in between wet coffee filters
3. Place coffee filters in sealed plastic bags
4. Place bags somewhere warm

As the seeds sprout you can pluck them off and plant them root side down into soil.
 

herzausstahl

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Here's what I always did when I sprouted Coast Redwood.

1. Soak seed in water for 24 hours
2. Place seeds in between wet coffee filters
3. Place coffee filters in sealed plastic bags
4. Place bags somewhere warm

As the seeds sprout you can pluck them off and plant them root side down into soil.
Did you ever try anything with Dawn Redwoods?
 

Christa

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Wow Bonsai Nut, is that tree for real??? It just made my bucket-list, I have to go hug a tree like that!

Thanks for all the advice guys. I suppose when it gets too hot I can move it to a cooler side of the house? But then it won't get much sun but I guess if it's used to fog and stuff that will be ok? Our winters is a lot drier than the summers but now that I know I'll be sure to give it a steam now and then. Seams like this is gonna be an interesting journey, I hope we get to 5 years and beyond!
 

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Wow Bonsai Nut, is that tree for real???

You bet it's real. Largest living species on the planet. Coast redwood might get "slightly" taller, but giant sequoia is much larger.

Here's one for @AlainK - a giant sequoia growing on the grounds of Château de Cheverny in the Loire Valley in France (planted around 1870).

giant-sequoia.jpg

Yes they're big trees :) I have yet to see a picture that begins to capture their scale. Even when you stand beneath them, it is still hard to contemplate their size...

sequoias.jpg

sequoias2.jpg
 

bleumeon

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I've seen the big ancient redwoods in person. Haven't seen the sequoias though. Truly beautiful trees. I'll be out backpacking this weekend and intend to photograph some of Southern California's oldest limber pines.
 

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I've seen the big ancient redwoods in person. Haven't seen the sequoias though. Truly beautiful trees. I'll be out backpacking this weekend and intend to photograph some of Southern California's oldest limber pines.

I've seen both. Redwoods just look like large beautiful trees to me. Sequoias are otherworldly :)
 

coh

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I've seen both. Redwoods just look like large beautiful trees to me. Sequoias are otherworldly :)
There's really no way to explain the feeling you get when standing amongst the giant sequoias. I had that opportunity about 25 years ago and it still is fresh in my mind. I took many photos but none of them did the trees justice. That National Geographic photo series with the climbers (you posted one earlier) is the closest I've seen anyone come to really capturing the massiveness of those trees on film. As a side note...I brought home a sequoia cone (probably illegal) and planted a few of the seeds. Several actually sprouted and I had them for a year or two, but at the time I was in school and they got neglected and eventually perished. Too bad, I'd have some 25 year old sequoias by now.

The coast redwoods are a very different feeling...I've hiked in those forests. Very beautiful, very fragrant (anyone who has worked with coast redwood bonsai knows that fragrance) but not the same overwhelming feeling.
 

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I've posted this elsewhere on this site, but if you are interested, this is a good site to pick up some Giant Sequoias :) I've bought a Sugar Pine and a Bristlecone Pine from them to experiment with, and I can recommend their trees and customer service.

Giant Sequoia Nursery

From the same site, here's a great comparison of the three species of redwoods.
 

AlainK

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Here's one for @AlainK - a giant sequoia growing on the grounds of Château de Cheverny in the Loire Valley in France (planted around 1870).

There are actually many "giant sequoias" (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in France, there are actually several in my small town (8,000 thousand inhabitants). They were a favorite for parks of private mansions along the Loire Valley in the 19th century, and probably earlier for some.

Two of them about 300 yards from where I live:

https://www.google.fr/maps/dir/47.8...xcfbbcf7e81f7b524!2m2!1d1.838707!2d47.8881289

But "coastal redwood" (Sequoia sempervirens) are very rare here although the few specimens I spotted here and there look much healthier.

There is a "triple trunk" one in the professional school where one of my son studied. In the background, on the right, there's also a Sequoiadendron giganteum.

https://www.google.fr/maps/@47.8820...4!1sZt_ZsPj9DQ9ddUhreNLLDA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
 

AlainK

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Here's one for @AlainK - a giant sequoia growing on the grounds of Château de Cheverny in the Loire Valley in France (planted around 1870).

There are actually many "giant sequoias" (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in France, there are actually several in my small town (8,000 thousand inhabitants). They were a favorite for parks of private mansions along the Loire Valley in the 19th century, and probably earlier for some.

Two of them about 300 yards from where I live:

https://www.google.fr/maps/dir/47.8...xcfbbcf7e81f7b524!2m2!1d1.838707!2d47.8881289

But "coastal redwood" (Sequoia sempervirens) are very rare here although the few specimens I spotted here and there look much healthier.

There is a "triple trunk" one in the professional school where one of my son studied. In the background, on the right, there's also a Sequoiadendron giganteum.

https://www.google.fr/maps/@47.8820...4!1sZt_ZsPj9DQ9ddUhreNLLDA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
 

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